Wed, 09 Jun 2021

#33: Collaborative Editing and Execution in Shared Byoby Sessions

Welcome to the 33th post in the rigorously raconteuring R recommendations series, or R4 for short. This post is also a post in the T4 series of tips, tricks, tools, and toys as it picks up and extends earlier posts on byobu. And it fits nicely in the more recent ESS-Intro series as we show some Emacs. You can find earlier R4 posts here, and the T4 posts here; the ESS-Intro series is here.

The focus of this short video (and slides) is on collaboration using files, but also entire sessions, execution and all aspects of joint exploration, development or debugging. Anything you can do in a terminal you can also do shared in a terminal. The video contains a brief lightning talk, and a shared session jointly with Grant McDermott and Vicent Arel-Bundock. My big big thanks to both of them for prodding and encouragement, as well as fearless participation in the joint section of the video:

The corresponding pdf slides are here.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Sat, 05 Jun 2021

td 0.0.4 on CRAN: More Maintenance

The still fairly recent td package for accessing the twelvedata API for financial data has been updated on CRAN this morning, and is now at released version 0.0.4. This corrects something the previous 0.0.3 release from last weekend was meant to address, but didn’t quite do it.

Access to the helper function finding a proper user config file (for .e.g., the API config) is now correctly conditioned on R 4.0.0, and the versioned depends has been removed.

The NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.0.4 (2021-06-05)

  • The version comparison was corrected and the package no longer (formally) depends on R (>= 4.0.0)

  • Very minor README.md edits

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Mon, 31 May 2021

inline 0.3.19: Another Update

A new release of the inline package got to CRAN today, following and further updating the recent update from earlier in the month. inline facilitates writing code in-line in simple string expressions or short files. The package was used quite extensively by Rcpp in the days before Rcpp Attributes arrived on the scene providing an even better alternative for its use cases. inline is still used by rstan and a number of other packages.

This release builds on and extends the work of the recent 0.3.18 release and tweaks some of the test. We cannot fully test all platforms used by CRAN so some times iterations such as this one are needed. The package was uploaded a few days ago, but it sometimes takes a few days to clarify changes over email to the CRAN maintainers whose work is still greatly appreciated.

The NEWS extract follows and details the changes some more.

Changes in inline version 0.3.19 (2021-05-25)

  • Documentation for moveDLL was updated and extended (Johannes in #22).

  • A few more tests were made conditional the test platform (Dirk in #24).

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Sun, 30 May 2021

td 0.0.3 on CRAN: Maintenance release

The still recent-ish td package for accessing the twelvedata API for financial data has been updated on CRAN yesterday, and is now at released version 0.0.3.

A few URLs were updated to please the lint checker, and a Depends: on R 4.0.0 or later was added. We then realized (as always just after the release …) that the core issue was an incorrect version comparison which we already fixed in the git repo.

The NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.0.3 (2021-05-29)

  • The package now (formally) depends on R (>= 4.0.0) as it uses a recently added R function for the default config file.

  • A few URLs were updated in the README.md file

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Sun, 23 May 2021

RcppArmadillo 0.10.5.0.0 on CRAN: New Upstream

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 865 other packages on CRAN.

This new release brings Armadillo 10.5.0 which was released early on Friday. We had done one full test in the ‘10.5 rc1’ prerelease one week earlier, and did another test on 10.5.0 and this 0.10.5.0.0 RcppArmadillo release just for added rigour. The package was then uploaded to CRAN late Friday (my timezone). The automated process flagged one NOTE as a false positive (yet another instance of the well-known (yet dreaded) issue of ‘Suggests != Depends’ by one these 865 packages). This lead to a need of an inspection by one of the CRAN maintainers, and the weekend being the weekend it was only processed just now.

Upstream moves at a speed that is a little faster than the cadence CRAN likes. As we had released RcppArmadillo 0.10.4.0.0 on April 13 we did not want to follow-up ‘too soon thereafter’ with 0.10.4.1.0 which was thusly only a GitHub and drat release (which can always be had easily too via install.packages("RcppArmadillo", repos="https://RcppCore.github.io/drat").)

The full set of changes follows. We include the aforementioned interim release as well.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.5.0 (2021-05-21)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 10.5 (Antipodean Fortress)

    • added .clamp() member function

    • expanded the standalone clamp() function to handle complex values

    • more efficient use of OpenMP

    • vector, matrix and cube constructors now initialise elements to zero by default; use the fill::none specifier, eg. mat X(4,5,fill::none), to disable element initialisation

  • Added codecov.yml to exclude Armadillo from coverage analysis

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.4.1.0 (2021-04-23)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 10.4.1 (Pressure Cooker)

  • GitHub-only release

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Wed, 19 May 2021

RcppDate 0.0.3: New Upstream

RcppDate wraps the featureful date library written by Howard Hinnant for use with R. This header-only modern C++ library has been in pretty wide-spread use for a while now, and adds to C++11/C++14/C++17 what will be (with minor modifications) the ‘date’ library in C++20.

Our previous 0.0.2 release already contained date version 3.0.0 from last year plus some of changes accumulated since then. Now that date 3.0.1 was just released, we are providing a quick sync with this version.

Changes in version 0.0.3 (2021-05-19)

  • Updated to upstream version 3.0.1

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 18 May 2021

inline 0.3.18: Routine Update

A new release of the inline package got to CRAN today. inline facilitates writing code in-line in simple string expressions or short files. The package was used quite extensively by Rcpp in the days before Rcpp Attributes arrived on the scene proving an even better alternative for its use cases. inline is still used by rstan and a number of other packages.

Johannes Ranke, who uses and stresses inline via his package mkin, updated the loading/unloading of DLLs which, following updates in R-devel, was failing some tests. As luck will have it, this new version appears to still fail on two of the platforms we do not actually have easy access to so another version may be coming “shortly”.

See below for a detailed list of changes extracted from the NEWS file.

Changes in inline version 0.3.18 (2021-05-17)

  • The moveDLL code and tests were updated for changed in R-devel (Johannes in #22 fixing #21).

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/inline | permanent link

Thu, 22 Apr 2021

drat 0.2.0: Now with ‘docs/’

drat user

A new release of drat arrived on CRAN today. This is the first release in a few months (with the last release in July of last year) and it (finally) makes the leap to supporting docs/ in the main branch as we are all so tired of the gh-pages branch. We also have new vignettes, new (and very shiny) documentation and refreshed vignettes!

drat stands for drat R Archive Template, and helps with easy-to-create and easy-to-use repositories for R packages. Since its inception in early 2015 it has found reasonably widespread adoption among R users because repositories with marked releases is the better way to distribute code. See below for a few custom reference examples.

Because for once it really is as your mother told you: Friends don’t let friends install random git commit snapshots. Or as we may now add: stay away from semi-random universes snapshots too.

Properly rolled-up releases it is. Just how CRAN shows us: a model that has demonstrated for two-plus decades how to do this. And you can too: drat is easy to use, documented by (now) six vignettes and just works.

The NEWS file summarises the release as follows:

Changes in drat version 0.2.0 (2021-04-21)

  • A documentation website for the package was added at https://eddelbuettel.github.io/drat/ (Dirk)

  • The continuous integration was switched to using ‘r-ci’ (Dirk)

  • The docs/ directory of the main repository branch can now be used instead of gh-pages branch (Dirk in #112)

  • A new repository https://github.com/drat-base/drat can now be used to fork an initial drat repository (Dirk)

  • A new vignette “Drat Step-by-Step” was added (Roman Hornung and Dirk in #117 fixing #115 and #113)

  • The test suite was refactored for docs/ use (Felix Ernst in #118)

  • The minimum R version is now ‘R (>= 3.6)’ (Dirk fixing #119)

  • The vignettes were switched to minidown (Dirk fixing #116)

  • A new test file was added to ensure ‘NEWS.Rd’ is always at the current release version.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. More detailed information is on the drat page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/drat | permanent link

Tue, 20 Apr 2021

Rblpapi 0.3.11: Several Updates

A new version 0.3.11 of Rblpapi is now arriving at CRAN. It comes two years after the release of version Rblpapit 0.3.10 and brings a few updates and extensions.

Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required).

This is the eleventh release since the package first appeared on CRAN in 2016. Changes are detailed below. Special thanks to James, Maxime and Michael for sending us pull requests.

Changes in Rblpapi version 0.3.11 (2021-04-20)

  • Support blpAutoAuthenticate and B-PIPE access, refactor and generalise authentication (James Bell in #285)

  • Deprecate excludeterm (John in #306)

  • Correct example in README.md (Maxime Legrand in #314)

  • Correct bds man page (and code) (Michael Kerber, and John, in #320)

  • Add GitHub Actions continuous integration (Dirk in #323)

  • Remove bashisms detected by R CMD check (Dirk #324)

  • Switch vignette to minidown (Dirk in #331)

  • Switch unit tests framework to tinytest (Dirk in #332)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the this release. As always, more detailed information is on the Rblpapi page. Questions, comments etc should go to the issue tickets system at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rblpapi | permanent link

Sat, 17 Apr 2021

RcppAPT 0.0.7: Micro Update

A new version of the RcppAPT package interfacing from R to the C++ library behind the awesome apt, apt-get, apt-cache, … commands and their cache powering Debian, Ubuntu and the like arrived on CRAN yesterday. This comes a good year after the previous maintenance update for release 0.0.6.

RcppAPT allows you to query the (Debian or Ubuntu) package dependency graph at will, with build-dependencies (if you have deb-src entries), reverse dependencies, and all other goodies. See the vignette and examples for illustrations.

The maintenance release responds to call for updates from CRAN desiring that make all implicit dependencies on packages markdown and rmarkdown explicit via a Suggests: entry. Two of the many packages I maintain were part of the (large !!) list in the CRAN email, and this is one of them. While making the update, we refreshed two other packaging details.

Changes in version 0.0.7 (2021-04-16)

  • Add rmarkdown to Suggests: as an implicit conditional dependency

  • Switch vignette to minidown and its water framework, add minidown to Suggests as well

  • Update two URLs in the README.md file

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release. A bit more information about the package is available here as well as as the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 13 Apr 2021

RcppArmadillo 0.10.4.0.0 on CRAN: New Upstream ‘Plus’

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 852 other packages on CRAN.

This new release brings us the just release Armadillo 10.4.0. Upstream moves at a speed that is a little faster than the cadence CRAN likes. We release RcppArmadillo 0.10.2.2.0 on March 9; and upstream 10.3.0 came out shortly thereafter. We aim to accomodate CRAN with (roughly) monthly (or less frequent) releases) so by the time we were ready 10.4.0 had just come out.

As it turns, the full testing had a benefit. Among the (currently) 852 CRAN packages using RcppArmadillo, two were failing tests. This is due to a subtle, but important point. Early on we realized that it would be beneficial if the standard R control over random-number creation and seeding affected Armadillo too, which Conrad accomodated kindly with an optional RNG interface—which RcppArmadillo supplies. With recent changes he made, the R side saw normally-distributed draws (via the Armadillo interface) changed, which lead to the two changes. All hail unit tests. So I mentioned this to Conrad, and with the usual Chicago-Brisbane time difference late my evening a fix was in my inbox. The CRAN upload was then halted as I had missed that due to other changes he had made random draws from a Gamma would now call std::rand() which CRAN flags. Another email to Brisbane, another late (one-line) fix back and all was good. We still encountered one package with an error but flagged this as internal to that package’s setup, so Uwe let RcppArmadillo onto CRAN, I contacted that package’s maintainer—who was very receptive and a change should be forthcoming. So with all that we have 0.10.4.0.0 on CRAN giving us Armadillo 10.4.0.

The full set of changes follows. As Armadillo 10.3.0 was not uploaded to CRAN, its changes are included too.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.4.0.0 (2021-04-12)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 10.4.0 (Pressure Cooker)

    • faster handling of triangular matrices by log_det()

    • added log_det_sympd() for log determinant of symmetric positive matrices

    • added ARMA_WARN_LEVEL configuration option, to control the degree of emitted warning messages

    • reduced the default degree of warning messages, so that failed decompositions, failed saving/loading, etc, no longer emit warnings

  • Apply one upstream corrections for arma::randn draws when using alternative (here R) generator, and arma::randg.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.3.0.0 (2021-03-10)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 10.3 (Sunrise Chaos)

    • faster handling of symmetric positive definite matrices by pinv()

    • expanded .save() / .load() for dense matrices to handle coord_ascii format

    • for out of bounds access, element accessors now throw the more nuanced std::out_of_range exception, instead of only std::logic_error

    • improved quality of random numbers

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Wed, 31 Mar 2021

Rcpp now used by 2250 CRAN packages!

2250 Rcpp packages

As of today, Rcpp stands at 2255 reverse-dependencies on CRAN. The graph on the left depicts the growth of Rcpp usage (as measured by Depends, Imports and LinkingTo, but excluding Suggests) over time. We actually crossed 2250 once a week ago, but “what CRAN giveth, CRAN also taketh” and counts can fluctuate. It had dropped back to 2248 a few days later.

Rcpp was first released in November 2008. It probably cleared 50 packages around three years later in December 2011, 100 packages in January 2013, 200 packages in April 2014, and 300 packages in November 2014. It passed 400 packages in June 2015 (when I tweeted about it), 500 packages in late October 2015, 600 packages in March 2016, 700 packages last July 2016, 800 packages last October 2016, 900 packages early January 2017, 1000 packages in April 2017, 1250 packages in November 2017, 1500 packages in November 2018, 1750 packages in August 2019, and then the big 2000 packages (as well as one in eight) in July 2020. The chart extends to the very beginning via manually compiled data from CRANberries and checked with crandb. The next part uses manually saved entries. The core (and by far largest) part of the data set was generated semi-automatically via a short script appending updates to a small file-based backend. A list of packages using Rcpp is available too.

Also displayed in the graph is the relative proportion of CRAN packages using Rcpp. The four per-cent hurdle was cleared just before useR! 2014 where I showed a similar graph (as two distinct graphs) in my invited keynote. We passed five percent in December of 2014, six percent July of 2015, seven percent just before Christmas 2015, eight percent in the summer of 2016, nine percent mid-December 2016, cracked ten percent in the summer of 2017 and eleven percent in 2018. Last year, along with passing 2000 package, we also passed 12.5 percent—so one more than in every eight CRAN packages depends on Rcpp. Stunning. There is more detail in the chart: how CRAN seems to be pushing back more and removing more aggressively (which my CRANberries tracks but not in as much detail as it could), how the growth of Rcpp seems to be slowing somewhat outright and even more so as a proportion of CRAN – as one would expect a growth curve to.

2250 user packages, and the continued growth, is truly mind-boggling. We can use the progression of CRAN itself compiled by Henrik in a series of posts and emails to the main development mailing list. Not that long ago CRAN itself did have only 1000 packages, then 5000, 10000, and here we are at over 17300 with Rcpp now at nearly 13.0% and still growing. Amazeballs.

The Rcpp team, recently grown in strength with the addition of Iñaki, continues to aim for keeping Rcpp as performant and reliable as it has been. A really big shoutout and Thank You! to all users and contributors of Rcpp for help, suggestions, bug reports, documentation or, of course, code.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 30 Mar 2021

x13binary 1.1.39-3 on CRAN: (Imperfect) Package Updates

A new release 1.1.39-3 of x13binary, of the X-13ARIMA-SEATS program by the US Census Bureau (with upstream release 1.1.39) is now on CRAN.

The x13binary package takes the pain out of installing X-13ARIMA-SEATS by making it a fully resolved CRAN dependency. For example, when installing the excellent seasonal package by Christoph, then X-13ARIMA-SEATS will get pulled in via the x13binary package and things just work. Just depend on x13binary and on all major OSs supported by R you should have an X-13ARIMA-SEATS binary installed which will be called seamlessly by the higher-level packages such as seasonal or gunsales. With this the full power of the what is likely the world’s most sophisticated deseasonalization and forecasting package is now at your fingertips and the R prompt, just like any other of the 17350+ CRAN packages. You can read more about this (and the seasonal package) in the Journal of Statistical Software paper by Christoph and myself.

This release was needed because the recent M1mac build was reporting leftover ‘detritus’ in the temporary directory, which we addressed with an explicit removal at end. We also addressed another CRAN Policy change since the last release, namely a conversion of the configure script from bash to sh.

Now, sadly, that second aspect blew up on Solaris, and the ‘detritus’ issue appears to be persist. By now Christoph and a colleague have installed R(-devel) on such an M1 machine, but still cannot reproduce. We will reach out to CRAN to learn more. A follow-up release 1.1.39-4 is likely.

The good news is that the standard macOS binary works on M1 as do other binaries thanks to the translation layer. We do however lack a genuine binary for Solaris so if any of the esteemed readers of this post happens to have access to R on Solaris along with a basic Fortran compiler, we would love to hear from you. Building X-13ARIMA-SEATS from source on Solaris should be straightforward, it is on the other OSs.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release showing changes to the previous release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/x13binary | permanent link

Sun, 28 Mar 2021

RcppSpdlog 0.0.5 on CRAN: New upstream versions

About three months after the last update, we can announce a new version 0.0.5 of RcppSpdlog. It contains releases 1.8.3, 1.8.4 and 1.8.5 of spdlog which were made in quick succession mid-week (while we were waiting on an update of CRAN’s own machinery) and was processed yesterday and overnight.

RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovich.

The NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in RcppSpdlog version 0.0.5 (2020-12-11)

  • Upgraded to upstream release spdlog 1.8.5 (and 1.8.4 and 1.8.3)

  • Small enhancements to DESCRIPTION files

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report. More detailed information is on the RcppSpdlog page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 09 Mar 2021

RcppArmadillo 0.10.2.2.0 on CRAN: New Upstream Patch Release

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 841 other packages on CRAN.

This release brings us a second update within the Armadillo 10.2 series, one month after the initial release. Upstream work has commenced at a 10.3 series with first pre-releases which we are currently testing. If possible, CRAN release will continue to be at least one month apart (such as this time) but we continue to make interim releases available on the Rcpp drat repo repo.

The full set of changes follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.2.2.0 (2021-03-09)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 10.2.2 (Cicada Swarm)

    • faster handling of subcubes

    • added tgamma()

    • added .brief_print() for abridged printing of matrices & cubes

    • expanded forms of trimatu() and trimatl() with diagonal specification to handle sparse matrices

    • expanded eigs_sym() and eigs_gen() with optional shift-invert mode

  • Removed debian/ directory from repository as packaging is on salsa.debian.org.

  • Relaxed tolerance on two cube tests on Windows to accomodate new 'gcc10-UCRT' builder.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Mon, 01 Mar 2021

RPushbullet 0.3.4: Small Update, Nicer Docs

RPpushbullet demo

Release 0.3.4 of the RPushbullet package arrived on CRAN today. RPushbullet interfaces the neat Pushbullet service for inter-device messaging, communication, and more. It lets you easily send (programmatic) alerts like the one to the left to your browser, phone, tablet, … – or all at once.

This release contains a contributed PR to better reflect an error code, and adds a mkdocs-material-based documentation site (just like a few other packages of mine). See below for more details.

Changes in version 0.3.4 (2021-03-01)

  • Return code checking using error code content if it exists (Thomas Shafer in #64).

  • Enabled GitHub Actions with encrypted JSON file for API access.

  • Added a package documentation website.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release. More details about the package are at the RPushbullet webpage and the RPushbullet GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rpushbullet | permanent link

Wed, 24 Feb 2021

RcppSimdJson 0.1.4 on CRAN: Small Bugfix

A quick note to say that we finalized a bugfix release 0.1.5 of RcppSimdJson yesterday which got onto CRAN earlier today. RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire and collaborators. Via very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle per byte parsed; see the video of the talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (also voted best talk).

This version brings a small fix to Windows where temporary filenames constructed from URLs (as for example constructed by our td package) need an extra sanization for a possible ‘?’ character. We will be addressing that properly “in due course” but for now a simple gsub() will do. The NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.1.5 (2021-02-23)

  • Temporary filenames from request URLs need an extra path sanitization on Windows as seen with package td.

  • A few #nocov tags were added to the code.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

For questions, suggestions, or issues please use the issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Mon, 22 Feb 2021

pkgKitten 0.2.1: Now with roxygen2 support

kitten

A new release 0.2.1 of pkgKitten hit CRAN earlier today, and has been uploaded to Debian as well. pkgKitten makes it simple to create new R packages via a simple function invocation. A wrapper kitten.r exists in the littler package to make it even easier.

This release builds on the support for tinytest we added in release 0.2.0 by adding more optional support, this time for roxygen2. It also corrects a minor documentation snafu, and updates the CI use.

Changes in version 0.2.1 (2021-02-22)

  • A small documentation error was corrected (David Dalpiaz in #15).

  • A new option ‘bunny’ adds support for roxygen2.

  • Continuous integration now use run.sh from r-ci.

More details about the package are at the pkgKitten webpage, the pkgKitten docs site, and the pkgKitten GitHub repo.

Courtesy of my CRANberries site, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/pkgkitten | permanent link

Thu, 18 Feb 2021

td 0.0.2 on CRAN: Updated and Expanded

The still very recent td package for accessing the twelvedata API for financial data has been updated and is now at version 0.0.2.

The time_series access point is now vectorised: supply a vector of symbols, and you receive list of data.frame (or xts) objects. See this tweet teasing out the earliest support for this new featire, and showing a quick four-securities plot. We also added simpler accessors get_quote() and get_price() rounding out the basic API support.

One first bug report alerting us to the fact that our use of RcppSimdJson requires an additional sanitizing of the temporary filename if used on Windows. We will fix that properly soon in new release 0.1.5 of that package; in the meantime you can get hot-fix binary 0.1.4.1 for Windows via install.packages("RcppSimdJson", repos="https://ghrr.github.io/drat") from the ghrr drat.

The NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.0.2 (2021-02-18)

  • The time_series is now vectorised and can return a list of return objects when given a vector of symbols

  • The use of tools::R_user_dir() is now conditional on having R 4.0.0 or later, older versions can use env.var for api key

  • New helper function store_key to save api key.

  • New simple accessors get_quote and get_price

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/td | permanent link

Wed, 17 Feb 2021

dang 0.0.13: New intradayMarketMonitor

sp500 intraday monitor

A new release of the dang package got to CRAN earlier today, a few months since the last relase. The dang package regroups a few functions of mine that had no other home as for example lsos() from a StackOverflow question from 2009 (!!) is one, this overbought/oversold price band plotter from an older blog post is another.

This release adds one function I tweeted about one month ago. It takes a function Josh Ulrich originally tweeted about in November with a reference to this gist. I refactored this into a proper functions and polished a few edges: the data now properly rolls off after a fixed delay (of two days), should work with other symbols (though we both focused on ^GSPC as a free (!!) real-time SP500 index (albeit only during trading hours), properly gaps between trading days and more. You can simply invoke it via

dang::intradayMarketMonitor()

and a chart just like the one here will grow (though there is no “state”: if you stop it, or reboot, or … the plot starts from scratch).

The short NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.0.13 (2021-02-17)

  • New function intradayMarketMonitor based on an earlier gist-posted snippet by Josh Ulrich.

  • The CI setup was generalized as a test for 'r-ci' and is used essentially unchanged with three different providers.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/dang | permanent link

Sat, 13 Feb 2021

RcppFastFloat 0.0.2: New Function

The second release of RcppFastFloat is now on CRAN. The package wraps fastfloat, another nice library by Daniel Lemire who showed in a recent arXiv paper that one can convert character representations of ‘numbers’ into floating point at rates at or exceeding one gigabyte per second.

Thanks to Brendan, this release adds a helper function as.double2() modeled after the base R function but using, of course, the features from fast_float in RcppFastFloat.

Release notes follow.

Changes in version 0.0.2 (2021-02-13)

  • New function as.double2() demonstrating fast_float (Brendan in #1)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Fri, 12 Feb 2021

RcppSimdJson 0.1.4 on CRAN: New Improvements

Brendan and I are happy to share that a new RcppSimdJson release 0.1.4 arrived on CRAN earlier today. RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire and collaborators. Via very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle per byte parsed; see the video of the talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (also voted best talk).

This version brings a new option to always return list types, tweaks to setting option in the the request and other small improvements. The NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.1.4 (2021-02-12)

  • Support additional headers in fload (Dirk in #60).

  • Enable continuous integration via GitHub Actions using run.sh from r-ci repo (Dirk in #61, #62).

  • Add option to always return list to fparse()/fload() (Brendan in #65 closing #64).

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

For questions, suggestions, or issues please use the issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Thu, 11 Feb 2021

td 0.0.1 on CRAN: New Finance Data Package

Thrilled to announce that a new package of mine just made it to CRAN: the td package accesses the twelvedata API for financial data.

Currently only the time_series REST access point is supported, but it is already supported with all meaningful options (we skipped only ‘JSON or CSV’ which makes no sense here) so for example any resolution between 1 minute and 1 month can be requested for any stock, etf or currency symbol for a wide array of exchanges. Historical access is available too via (optional) start and end dates. We return either raw JSON or a data.frame or an xts object making it trivial to call high-end plotting functions on the data–the project and repo pages show several examples.

As just one example, here is GME during the follies. We simply request via

> gme <- time_series("GME", "1min",
+                    start_date="2021-01-25 09:30:00",
+                    end_date="2021-02-04 16:00:00", as="xts")

(where the API key is either in a user-local config file accessed via the new-ish R function tools::R_user_dir("td") pointing at this package’s directory, or via an environment variable; either is accessed at package load or attachment) from which we can then plot via quantmod

> quantmod::chart_Series(gme, name=paste0(attr(gme, "symbol"), "/", attr(gme, "exchange")))

which shows how we also helpfully store metadata returned by twelvedata as extra attributes of the object. The chart is

You will need an API key to have up to 800 daily accesses for free, higher-performance plans (including websocket access) are available for paying customers too. I have only used the free API so far myself.

I plan to add quote and price support this weekend, and generalize the time series access to returning lists of objects as the API does in fact support multi-security access. As always, feedback is welcomed. Please post comments and suggestions at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/td | permanent link

Wed, 10 Feb 2021

RcppSMC 0.2.3 on CRAN: Updated Snapshot

A new release 0.2.3 of the RcppSMC package arrived on CRAN earlier today. Once again it progressed as a very quick pretest-publish within minutes of submission—thanks CRAN!

RcppSMC provides Rcpp-based bindings to R for the Sequential Monte Carlo Template Classes (SMCTC) by Adam Johansen described in his JSS article. Sequential Monte Carlo is also referred to as Particle Filter in some contexts.

This release somewhat belatedly merges a branch Leah had been working on and which we all realized “is ready”. We now have a good snapshot to base new work on, as maybe with the Google Summer of Code 2021.

Changes in RcppSMC version 0.2.3 (2021-02-10)

  • Addition of a Github Action CI runner (Dirk)

  • Switching to inheritance for the moveset rather than pointers to functions (Leah in #45).

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report for this release.

More information is on the RcppSMC page. Issues and bugreports should go to the GitHub issue tracker.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 09 Feb 2021

RcppArmadillo 0.10.2.1.0: New Upstream Release

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 823 other packages on CRAN.

This release brings us Armadillo 10.2 with a few updates as detailed below in the list of changes. Upstream release 10.2 was made a couple of days ago, but we need to balance new upstream updates with a responsible release cadence at CRAN. As we needed a maintenance release in early January, I opted to wait four weeks with this one which hence gets us 10.2.0 and 10.2.1 at once. As tweeted (with a follow-up) it had yet another very smooth passage at CRAN so we again appreciate the excellent work of the CRAN maintainers and say Thank You!.

Anybody who desires more frequent updates show look at the RcppCore drat repo which provides more frequent interim updates. Here for example we also had 0.10.2.0.0 available for your testing pleasure.

Also of note is that here is now a Python variant pyarma for those who might want enjoy Armadillo with Python.

The full set of changes follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.2.1.0 (2021-02-09)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 10.2.1 (Cicada Swarm)

    • faster handling of subcubes

    • added tgamma()

    • added .brief_print() for abridged printing of matrices & cubes

    • expanded forms of trimatu() and trimatl() with diagonal specification to handle sparse matrices

    • expanded eigs_sym() and eigs_gen() with optional shift-invert mode

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Fri, 05 Feb 2021

RcppFastFloat 0.0.1: New Package, Already on CRAN

A new package, once again based on wonderful library by Daniel Lemire, is now on CRAN in its initial version 0.0.1. Daniel, in a recent arXiv paper shows that one can convert character representations of ‘numbers’ into floating point at rates at or exceeding one gigabyte per second. His tests show a fourfold gain over library functions such as strtod.

We put a simply package together showing use of the example parser, and containing a simple ‘all-in’ comparison benchmark (where we time the function call overhead as well) and get roughly 3x. See the repo for details; we are borring the table and figure here:

> source("comparison.R")
Unit: milliseconds
      expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval cld
     scanf 218.8936 224.1223 238.5650 227.1901 229.9116 1343.433   100   c
      atof 124.8087 127.3274 129.4104 128.5858 130.9138  146.334   100  b 
    strtod 124.5705 127.2157 129.1238 129.1042 130.7504  137.143   100  b 
      stod 127.1751 129.7343 131.7339 131.4854 133.1425  147.763   100  b 
 fastfloat  40.6219  41.3042  42.5729  42.3209  43.1738   57.788   100 a  
> 

Or in chart form:

Not much to say yet for the initial release:

Changes in version 0.0.1 (2021-01-31)

  • Initial version and CRAN upload

While the package was waiting to be added to CRAN, Brendan already added a potential as.double() replacement which will be in the next version.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sat, 30 Jan 2021

RcppDate 0.0.2: Regular Update

RcppDate wraps the date library by Howard Hinnant for use with R. This header-only modern C++ library has been in pretty wide-spread use for a while now, and adds to C++11/C++14/C++17 what will be (with minor modifications) the ‘date’ library in C++20. Since the original 0.0.1 CRAN release I have also added this package along with RcppCCTZ and nanotime (which uses / requires both) to Debian so an apt based install is also possible for some.

Release 0.0.2 arrived on CRAN yesterday. It simply updates the included library to version upstream version 3.0.0, and touches up some packaging internals for continued integration.

Changes in version 0.0.2 (2021-01-29)

  • Added GitHub Actions CI via run.sh from r-ci

  • Updated to upstream version 3.0.0 (plus newer commits)

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sat, 23 Jan 2021

prrd 0.0.4: More tweaks

prrd facilitates the parallel running [of] reverse dependency [checks] when preparing R packages. It is used extensively for Rcpp, RcppArmadillo, RcppEigen, BH, and possibly others.

prrd screenshot image

The key idea of prrd is simple, and described in some more detail on its webpage and its GitHub repo. Reverse dependency checks are an important part of package development that is easily done in a (serial) loop. But these checks are also generally embarassingly parallel as there is no or little interdependency between them (besides maybe shared build depedencies). See the (dated) screenshot (running six parallel workers, arranged in split byobu session).

This release brings several smaller tweaks and improvements to the summary report that had accumulated in my use since the last realease last April. We also updated the CI runners as one does these days.

The release is summarised in the NEWS entry:

Changes in prrd version 0.0.4 (2021-01-23)

  • Report summary mode is now compact, more robust and reports extended CRAN summaries. (Dirk via several changes)

  • Continuous Integration now uses run.sh from r-ci

My CRANberries provides the usual summary of changes to the previous version. See the aforementioned webpage and its repo for details. For more questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/prrd | permanent link

Fri, 15 Jan 2021

Rcpp 1.0.6: Some Updates

rcpp logo

The Rcpp team is proud to announce release 1.0.6 of Rcpp which arrived at CRAN earlier today, and has been uploaded to Debian too. Windows and macOS builds should appear at CRAN in the next few days. This marks the first release on the new six-months cycle announced with release 1.0.5 in July. As reminder, interim ‘dev’ or ‘rc’ releases will often be available in the Rcpp drat repo; this cycle there were four.

Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing R with C or C++ code. As of today, 2174 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further (which is an 8.5% increase just since the last release), along with 207 in BioConductor.

This release features six different pull requests from five different contributors, mostly fixing fairly small corner cases, plus some minor polish on documentation and continuous integration. Before releasing we once again made numerous reverse dependency checks none of which revealed any issues. So the passage at CRAN was pretty quick despite the large dependency footprint, and we are once again grateful for all the work the CRAN maintainers do.

Changes in Rcpp patch release version 1.0.6 (2021-01-14)

  • Changes in Rcpp API:

    • Replace remaining few uses of EXTPTR_PTR with R_ExternalPtrAddr (Kevin in #1098 fixing #1097).

    • Add push_back and push_front for DataFrame (Walter Somerville in #1099 fixing #1094).

    • Remove a misleading-to-wrong comment (Mattias Ellert in #1109 cleaning up after #1049).

    • Address a sanitizer report by initializing two private bool variables (Benjamin Christoffersen in #1113).

    • External pointer finalizer toggle default values were corrected to true (Dirk in #1115).

  • Changes in Rcpp Documentation:

    • Several URLs were updated to https and/or new addresses (Dirk).
  • Changes in Rcpp Deployment:

    • Added GitHub Actions CI using the same container-based setup used previously, and also carried code coverage over (Dirk in #1128).
  • Changes in Rcpp support functions:

    • Rcpp.package.skeleton() avoids warning from R. (Dirk)

Thanks to my CRANberries, you can also look at a diff to the previous release. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page. Bugs reports are welcome at the GitHub issue tracker as well (where one can also search among open or closed issues); questions are also welcome under rcpp tag at StackOverflow which also allows searching among the (currently) 2616 previous questions.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub. My sincere thanks to my current sponsors for me keeping me caffeinated.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Mon, 11 Jan 2021

BH 1.75.0-0: New upstream release, added Beast

Boost

Boost is a very large and comprehensive set of (peer-reviewed) libraries for the C++ programming language, containing well over 100 individual libraries. The BH package provides a sizeable subset of header-only libraries for use by R.

Version 1.75.0 of Boost was released in December, right on schedule with their April, August and December releases. I now try to follow these releases at a lower (annual) cadence and prepared BH 1.75.0-0 in mid-December. Extensive reverse-depends checks revealed a need for changes in a handful of packages whose maintainers I contacted then. With one exception, everybody responded in kind and brought updated packages to CRAN which permitted us to upload the package there two days ago. And thanks to this planned and coordinated upload, the package is now available on CRAN a mere two days later. My thanks to the maintainers of these packages for helping it along; this prompt responses really are appreciated. The version on CRAN is the same as the one the drat announced in this tweet asking for testing help. If you installed that version, you are still current as no changes were required since December and CRAN now contains same file.

This release adds one new library: Boost Beast, an http and websocket library built on top of Boost Asio. Other changes are highlighed below.

Changes in version 1.75.0-0 (2020-12-12)

  • Removed file NAMESPACE as the package has neither R code, nor a shared library to load

  • The file LICENSE_1_0.txt is now included (as requested in #73)

  • Added new beast library (as requested in #74)

  • Upgraded to Boost 1.75.0 (#75)

Via CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to the previous release. Its final line is quite impressive: 3485 files changed, 100838 insertions(+), 84890 deletions(-). Wow.

Comments and suggestions about BH are welcome via the issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/bh | permanent link

Sun, 10 Jan 2021

RcppArmadillo 0.10.1.2.2: Minor update

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 802 other packages on CRAN.

This release was needed because we use the Matrix package for some (optional) tests related to sparse matrices, and a small and subtle change and refinement in the recent 1.3.0 release of Matrix required us to make an update for the testing. Nothing has changed in how we set up, or operate on, sparse matrices. My thanks to Binxiang and Martin Maechler for feedback and suggestion on the initial fix both Binxiang and I set up independently. At the same time we upgrade some package internals related to continuous integration (for that, also see my blog post and video from earlier this week). Lastly Conrad sent in a one-line upstream fix for dealing with NaN in sign().

The full set of changes follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.1.2.2 (2021-01-08)

  • Correct one unit test for Matrix 1.3.0-caused changed (Binxiang in #319 and Dirk in #322).

  • Suppress one further warning from Matrix (Dirk)

  • Apply an upstream NaN correction (Conrad in #321)

  • Added GitHub Actions CI using run.sh from r-ci (Dirk)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Thu, 07 Jan 2021

#32: Portable Continuous Integration using r-ci

Welcome to the 32th post in the rarely raucous R recommendations series, or R4 for short. This post covers continuous integration, a topic near and dear to many of us who have to recognise its added value.

The popular and widely-used service at Travis is undergoing changes driven by a hard-to-argue with need for monetization. A fate that, if we’re honest, lies ahead for most “free” services so who know, maybe one day we have to turn away from other currently ubiquitous service. Because one never knows, it can pay off to not get to tied to any one service. Which brings us to today’s post and my r-ci service which allows me to run CI at Travis, at GitHub, at Azure, and on local Docker containers as the video demonstrates. It will likely also work at GitLab and other services, I simply haven’t tried any others.

The slides are here. The r-ci website introduces r-ci at a high-level. This repo at GitHub contains run.sh, and can be used to raise issues, ask questions, or provide feedback.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Thu, 17 Dec 2020

RcppEigen 0.3.3.9.1: New upstream

A new release 0.3.3.9.1 of RcppEigen arrived on CRAN today (and just went to Debian too) bringing support for Eigen 3.3.9 to R. Eigen is a C++ template library for linear algebra: matrices, vectors, numerical solvers, and related algorithms.

The release started with a gentle nudge from the Stan team to package Eigen 3.3.8. And once I got around to it and sat down, Eigen 3.3.9 had just been released the previous day. The freshly prepared release 0.3.3.9.0 was then announced on Twitter (and the rcpp-devel mailing list) along with a request for testing alongside the usual extended reverse dependency checking we do (just like CRAN asks us to). And it turns out that Eigen 3.3.9 required an update to StanHeaders, a CRAN package that is itself quite widely used. This took a couple of days and its round of testing, but Ben Goodrich shipped it to CRAN last night, so we were able to ship RcppEigen in turn today.

So this release once again bring few required changes to Eigen (see this directory for details). As we said for the previous three releases:

One additional and recent change was the accomodation of a recent CRAN Policy change to not allow gcc or clang to mess with diagnostic messages. A word of caution: this may make your compilation of packages using RcppEigen very noisy so consider adding -Wno-ignored-attributes to the compiler flags added in your ~/.R/Makevars.

I actually find this requirement rather annoying. Eigen is then only usable if you set, say,

-Wno-deprecated-declarations -Wno-parentheses -Wno-ignored-attributes -Wno-unused-function

as g++ options in ~/.R/Makevars. But CRAN makes the rules. Maybe if a few of us gently and politely nudge them they may relent one day. One can only hope.

The complete NEWS file entry follows.

Changes in RcppEigen version 0.3.3.9.1 (2020-12-17)

  • Upgraded to Eigen 3.3.9 (Dirk in #92 fixing #91).

  • Added GitHub Actions CI using run.sh from r-ci (Dirk)

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the most recent release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 15 Dec 2020

RcppAnnoy 0.0.18: Tweaks

annoy image

A new maintenance release, now at version 0.0.18, of RcppAnnoy is now on CRAN. RcppAnnoy is the Rcpp-based R integration of the nifty Annoy library by Erik Bernhardsson. Annoy is a small and lightweight C++ template header library for very fast approximate nearest neighbours—originally developed to drive the famous Spotify music discovery algorithm.

This release is follow-up to release 0.0.17 which was made four weeks ago, and which brought the new upstream release 1.17 of Annoy. We now have an updated upstream with a PR by Aaron aiming for improved control of RNG seeding to ensure better reproducibility, along with extended tests and new helpers for RcppAnnoy and Annoy version numbers. The release was once again coordinated with Annoy and James whose BiocNeighbors and uwot packages both consume the Annoy header library shipped here.

Detailed changes follow below.

Changes in version 0.0.18 (2020-12-15)

  • Small tweaks to threading policy header defines (Dirk closing #65)

  • Vignette code is again compiled during testing (Aaron Lum and Dirk in #66 addressing #64)

  • Upstream code (with Aaron's PR) was synchronized once more (Dirk in #67)

  • A new helper function was added to report the Annoy version (Aaron in #68)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Fri, 11 Dec 2020

RcppSpdlog 0.0.4: New upstream

Not quite two months after the last release, we are happy to announce version 0.0.4 of RcppSpdlog. It contains release 1.8.2 of spdlog made today, along with version 7.1.3 of fmt.

RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovich.

The NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in RcppSpdlog version 0.0.4 (2020-12-11)

  • Upgraded to upstream release spdlog 1.8.2

  • Added GitHub Actions CI using run.sh from r-ci

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report. More detailed information is on the RcppSpdlog page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Thu, 03 Dec 2020

#31: Test your R package against bleeding-edge gcc

Welcome to the 31th post in the rapturously rampant R recommendations series, or R4 for short. This post will once again feature Docker for use with R.

Earlier this week, I received a note from CRAN about how my RcppTOML package was no longer building with the (as of right now of course unreleased) version 11 of the GNU C++ compiler, i.e. g++-11. And very kindly even included a hint about the likely fix (which was of course correct). CRAN, and one of its maintainers in particular, is extremely forward-looking in terms of toolchain changes. A year ago we were asked to updated possible use of global variables in C code as gcc-10 tightened the rules. This changes is a C++ one, and a fairly simple one of simply being more explicit with include headers. Previous g++ release had done the same.

The question now was about the least painful way to get g++-11 onto my machine, with the least amount of side-effects. Regular readers of this blog will know where this is headed, but even use of Docker requires binaries. A look at g++-11 within packages.debian.org comes up empty. No Debian means no Ubuntu. But … there is a PPA for Ubuntu with toolchain builds we have used before. And voilà there we have it: within the PPA for Ubuntu Toolchain repository is the volatile packages PPA with both g++-10 and g++-11. Here Ubuntu 20.10 works with g++-10, but g++-11 requires Ubuntu 21.04. Docker containers are there for either. So with the preliminaries sorted out, the key steps are fairly straightforward:

  • start from ubuntu:21.04 to be able to install g++-11 later
  • install the software-properties-common package to be able to add a PPA
  • (plus a few more packages to deal with the repository signing key)
  • run the sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-toolchain-r/volatile command to add the volatile packages PPA
  • install g++-11 (along with, for good measure) gcc-11 and gfortran-11
  • use update-alternative (a clever Debian/Ubuntu command) to make version ‘11’ the default
  • install R itself (via r-base-core) which we simply take from the distro as 21.04 is by construction very recent
  • install Rcpp via the r-cran-rcpp binary which covers all dependencies for the package in question

And that is it! RcppTOML is fairly minimal and could be a member of the tinyverse so no other dependencies are needed—if your package has any you could just use the standard steps to install from source, or binary (including using RSPM or bspm). You can see the resulting Dockerfile which contains a minimal amount of extra stuff to deal with some environment variables and related settings. Nothing critical, but it smoothes the experience somewhat.

This container is now built (under label rocker/r-edge with tags latest and gcc-11), and you can download it from Docker Hub. With that the ‘proof’ of the (now fixed and uploaded) package building becomes as easy as

edd@rob:~/git/rcpptoml(master)$ docker run --rm -ti -v $PWD:/mnt -w /mnt rocker/r-edge:gcc-11 g++ --version
g++ (Ubuntu 11-20201128-0ubuntu2) 11.0.0 20201128 (experimental) [master revision fb6b29c85c4:a331ca6194a:e87559d202d90e614315203f38f9aa2f5881d36e]
Copyright (C) 2020 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

edd@rob:~/git/rcpptoml(master)$ 
edd@rob:~/git/rcpptoml(master)$ docker run --rm -ti -v $PWD:/mnt -w /mnt rocker/r-edge:gcc-11 R CMD INSTALL RcppTOML_0.1.7.tar.gz
* installing to library ‘/usr/local/lib/R/site-library’
* installing *source* package ‘RcppTOML’ ...
** using staged installation
** libs
g++ -std=gnu++11 -I"/usr/share/R/include" -DNDEBUG -I../inst/include/ -DCPPTOML_USE_MAP -I'/usr/lib/R/site-library/Rcpp/include'    -fpic  -g -O2 -fdebug-prefix-map=/build/r-base-Fuvi9C/r-base-4.0.3=. -fstack-protector-strong -Wformat -Werror=format-security -Wdate-time -D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=2 -g  -c RcppExports.cpp -o RcppExports.o
g++ -std=gnu++11 -I"/usr/share/R/include" -DNDEBUG -I../inst/include/ -DCPPTOML_USE_MAP -I'/usr/lib/R/site-library/Rcpp/include'    -fpic  -g -O2 -fdebug-prefix-map=/build/r-base-Fuvi9C/r-base-4.0.3=. -fstack-protector-strong -Wformat -Werror=format-security -Wdate-time -D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=2 -g  -c parse.cpp -o parse.o
g++ -std=gnu++11 -shared -L/usr/lib/R/lib -Wl,-Bsymbolic-functions -Wl,-z,relro -o RcppTOML.so RcppExports.o parse.o -L/usr/lib/R/lib -lR
installing to /usr/local/lib/R/site-library/00LOCK-RcppTOML/00new/RcppTOML/libs
** R
** inst
** byte-compile and prepare package for lazy loading
** help
*** installing help indices
** building package indices
** testing if installed package can be loaded from temporary location
** checking absolute paths in shared objects and dynamic libraries
** testing if installed package can be loaded from final location
** testing if installed package keeps a record of temporary installation path
* DONE (RcppTOML)
edd@rob:~/git/rcpptoml(master)$ 

I hope both the availability of such a base container with gcc-11 (and g++-11 and gfortran-11) as well as a “recipe” for building similar containers with newer clang version will help other developers.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/r4 | permanent link

Wed, 02 Dec 2020

RcppTOML 0.1.7: Support for g++-11, Minor Updates

A new RcppTOML release arrived on CRAN earlier today evening. RcppTOML brings TOML to R.

TOML is a file format that is most suitable for configurations, as it is meant to be edited by humans but read by computers. It emphasizes strong readability for humans while at the same time supporting strong typing as well as immediate and clear error reports. On small typos you get parse errors, rather than silently corrupted garbage. Much preferable to any and all of XML, JSON or YAML – though sadly these may be too ubiquitous now. TOML has been making inroads with projects such as the Hugo static blog compiler, or the Cargo system of Crates (aka “packages”) for the Rust language.

CRAN had sent us a note that the package no longer compiled under the [unreleased, of course, never change, BDR ;-) ] g++-11 compiler, but were kind enough to hint that it was only lacking an #include <limits>. These things happen: newer compilers are generally more strict, and that is generally a good things. (Last year this time we prepped code for the more stringent view on global variables under gcc-10. Earlier g++ version had similar demands to clarify include headers.) I set up a simple Docker contain with on Ubuntu 21.04 with g++-11, R, and Rcpp to build the package and make this change (which was of course also PR’ed upstream at cpptoml), plus some other small ones that update the package since the last release roughly 18 months ago. We also switched CI use to the r-ci setup I should blog about a little more, removed a bashism and updated a few URLs. The bulleted list of changes in this version follows.

Changes in version 0.1.7 (2020-12-01)

  • Add #include <limits> to header file, also contributed upstream, to permit compilation under the (unreleased) g++-11.

  • Switch the simple cleanup script to sh.

  • Switch CI use to r-ci for focal and bspm.

  • Update several TOML URLs to https://toml.io/en/.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report for this release. More information is on the RcppTOML page page. Please use the GitHub issue tracker for issues and bugreports.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Mon, 30 Nov 2020

inline 0.3.17: Refactored and New Tests

A new release of the inline package arrived on CRAN this evening and has already been shipped to Debian as well. inline facilitates writing code in-line in simple string expressions or short files. The package was used quite extensively by Rcpp in the days before Rcpp Attributes arrived on the scene proving an even better alternative for its use cases. inline is still use by rstan and a number of other packages.

One of those other packages is mkin, and its author Johannes Ranke overhauled the saving and re-loading of C functions part with a really well-done set of contributions. In the process we also added unit testing via the lovely tinytest, and changed to continuous integration setup to r-ci.

See below for a detailed list of changes extracted from the NEWS file.

Changes in inline version 0.3.17 (2020-11-30)

  • Unit testing is now supported via tinytest (Johannes in #15 addressing #14).

  • CI was updated to use focal and run.sh from r-ci on Travis and GitHub Actions (Dirk)

  • The writing and reading of compiled code was refactored and extended (Johannes in #16 fixing #13).

  • Some minor problems related to CRAN checks and tests were corrected (Johannes and Dirk in #17, Johannes in #18, #19, #20).

  • Small stylistic updates have been applied to some R and Rd files (Dirk).

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/inline | permanent link

Mon, 16 Nov 2020

RcppArmadillo 0.10.1.2.0

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 779 other packages on CRAN.

This release ties up a few loose ends from the recent 0.10.1.0.0.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.1.2.0 (2020-11-15)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 10.1.2 (Orchid Ambush)

  • Remove three unused int constants (#313)

  • Include main armadillo header using quotes instead of brackets

  • Rewrite version number use in old-school mode because gcc 4.8.5

  • Skipping parts of sparse conversion on Windows as win-builder fails

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

RcppAnnoy 0.0.17

annoy image

A new release 0.0.17 of RcppAnnoy is now on CRAN. RcppAnnoy is the Rcpp-based R integration of the nifty Annoy library by Erik Bernhardsson. Annoy is a small and lightweight C++ template header library for very fast approximate nearest neighbours—originally developed to drive the famous Spotify music discovery algorithm.

This release brings a new upstream version 1.17, released a few weeks ago, which adds multithreaded index building. This changes the API by adding a new ‘threading policy’ parameter requiring code using the main Annoy header to update. For this reason we waited a little for the dust to settle on the BioConductor 3.12 release before bringing the changes to BiocNeighbors via this commit and to uwot via this simple PR. Aaron and James updated their packages accordingly so by the time I uploaded RcppAnnoy it made for very smooth sailing as we all had done our homework with proper conditional builds, and the package had no other issue preventing automated processing at CRAN. Yay. I also added a (somewhat overdue one may argue) header file RcppAnnoy.h regrouping defines and includes which should help going forward.

Detailed changes follow below.

Changes in version 0.0.17 (2020-11-15)

  • Upgrade to Annoy 1.17, but default to serial use.

  • Add new header file to regroup includes and defines.

  • Upgrade CI script to use R with bspm on focal.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Thu, 12 Nov 2020

tidyCpp 0.0.2: More documentation and features

A first update of the still fairly new package tidyCpp is now on CRAN. The packages offers a C++ layer on top of the C API for R which aims to make its use a little easier and more consistent.

The vignette has been extended with a new examples, a new section and some general editing. A few new defines have been added mostly from the Rinternals.h header. We also replaced the Shield class with a simpler yet updated version class Protect. The name better represent the core functionality of offering a simpler alternative to the PROTECT and UNPROTECT macro pairing. We also added a short discussion to the vignette of a gotcha one has to be mindful of, and that we fell for ourselves in version 0.0.1. We also added a typedef so that code using Shield can still be used.

The NEWS entry follows.

Changes in tidyCpp version 0.0.2 (2020-11-12)

  • Expanded definitions in internals.h to support new example.

  • The vignette has been extended with an example based on package uchardet.

  • Class Shield has been replaced by an new class Protect; a compatibility typdef has been added.

  • The examples and vignette have been clarified with respect to proper ownership of protected objects; a new vignette section was added.

Thanks to my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

For questions, suggestions, or issues please use the issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/tidycpp | permanent link

Mon, 02 Nov 2020

RcppSimdJson 0.1.2: New Upstream, New Utilities

A new RcppSimdJson release arrived on CRAN late yesterday bringing along the one recently updated simdjson release 0.6.0.

RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire and collaborators. Via very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle per byte parsed; see the video of the talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (also voted best talk).

Other than the upstream update, Brendan added some new utilities to check for valid utf-8 or json format, and to minify json plus a small workaround for a clang-9 bug we encountered. We can confirm Daniel’s statement on ridiculously fast utf-8 validattion. It is so cool to work with amazing tools.

The NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.1.3 (2020-11-01)

  • Added URLs to DESCRIPTION (Dirk closing #50).

  • Upgraded to simdjson 0.6.0 (Dirk in #52).

  • New policy option to always convert integers to int64_t (Brendan in #55 closing #54).

  • Added workaround for odd clang-9 bug (Brendan in #57).

  • New utility functions is_valid_utf8(), is_valid_json() and fminify() (Brendan in #58).

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

For questions, suggestions, or issues please use the issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sat, 24 Oct 2020

digest 0.6.27: Build fix

Exactly one week after the previous release 0.6.26 of digest, a minor cleanup release 0.6.27 just arrived on CRAN and will go to Debian shortly.

digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, spookyhash, and blake3 algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects. It is a fairly widely-used package (currently listed at one million monthly downloads, 282 direct reverse dependencies and 8068 indirect reverse dependencies, or just under half of CRAN) as many tasks may involve caching of objects for which it provides convenient general-purpose hash key generation.

Release 0.6.26 brought support for the (nice, even cryptographic) blake3 hash algorithm. In the interest of broader buildability we had already (with a sad face) disabled a few very hardware-specific implementation aspects using intrinsic ops. But to our chagrin, we left one #error define that raised its head on everybody’s favourite CRAN build platform. Darn. So 0.6.27 cleans that up and also removes the check and #error as … all the actual code was already commented out. If you read this and tears start running down your cheeks, then by all means come and help us bring blake3 to its full (hardware-accelerated) potential. This (probably) only needs a little bit of patient work with the build options and configurations. You know where to find us…

My CRANberries provides the usual summary of changes to the previous version.

For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/digest | permanent link

Fri, 23 Oct 2020

RcppSpdlog 0.0.3: New features and much more docs

A good month after the initial two releases, we are thrilled to announce relase 0.0.3 of RcppSpdlog. This brings us release 1.8.1 of spdlog as well as a few local changes (more below).

RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovic.

This version of RcppSpdlog brings a new top-level function setLogLevel to control what events get logged, updates the main example to show this and to also make the R-aware logger the default logger, and adds both an extended vignette showing several key features and a new (external) package documentation site.

The NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in RcppSpdlog version 0.0.3 (2020-10-23)

  • New function setLogLevel with R accessor in exampleRsink example

  • Updated exampleRsink to use default logger instance

  • Upgraded to upstream release 1.8.1 which contains finalised upstream use to switch to REprintf() if R compilation detected

  • Added new vignette with extensive usage examples, added compile-time logging switch example

  • A package documentation website was added

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report. More detailed information is on the RcppSpdlog page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Wed, 21 Oct 2020

RcppZiggurat 0.1.6

ziggurats

A new release, now at version 0.1.6, of RcppZiggurat is now on the CRAN network for R.

The RcppZiggurat package updates the code for the Ziggurat generator by Marsaglia and other which provides very fast draws from a Normal distribution. The package provides a simple C++ wrapper class for the generator improving on the very basic macros, and permits comparison among several existing Ziggurat implementations. This can be seen in the figure where Ziggurat from this package dominates accessing the implementations from the GSL, QuantLib and Gretl—all of which are still way faster than the default Normal generator in R (which is of course of higher code complexity).

This release brings a corrected seed setter and getter which now correctly take care of all four state variables, and not just one. It also corrects a few typos in the vignette. Both were fixed quite a while back, but we somehow managed to not ship this to CRAN for two years.

The NEWS file entry below lists all changes.

Changes in version 0.1.6 (2020-10-18)

  • Several typos were corrected in the vignette (Blagoje Ivanovic in #9).

  • New getters and setters for internal state were added to resume simulations (Dirk in #11 fixing #10).

  • Minor updates to cleanup script and Travis CI setup (Dirk).

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report for this release. More information is on the RcppZiggurat page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 20 Oct 2020

RcppArmadillo 0.10.1.0.0

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 786 other packages on CRAN.

A little while ago, Conrad released version 10.1.0 of Armadillo, a a new major release. As before, given his initial heads-up we ran two full reverse-depends checks, and as a consequence contacted four packages authors (two by email, two via PR) about a miniscule required change (as Armadillo now defaults to C++11, an old existing setting of avoiding C++11 lead to an error). Our thanks to those who promptly update their packages—truly appreciated. As it turns out, Conrad also softened the error by the time the release ran around.

But despite our best efforts, the release was delayed considerably by CRAN. We had made several Windows test builds but luck had it that on the uploaded package CRAN got itself a (completely spurious segfault—which can happen on a busy machine building machine things at once). Sadly it took three or four days for CRAN to reply our email. After which it took another number of days for them to ponder the behaviour of a few new ‘deprecated’ messaged tickled by at the most ten or so (out of 786) packages. Oh well. So here we are, eleven days after I emailed the rcpp-devel list about the new package being on CRAN but possibly delayed (due to that seg.fault). But during all that time the package was of course available via the Rcpp drat.

The changes in this release are summarized below as usual and are mostly upstream along with an improved Travis CI setup due to the aforementioned use of the bspm package for binaries at Travis.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.1.0.0 (2020-10-09)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 10.1.0 (Orchid Ambush)

    • C++11 is now the minimum required C++ standard

    • faster handling of compound expressions by trimatu() and trimatl()

    • faster sparse matrix addition, subtraction and element-wise multiplication

    • expanded sparse submatrix views to handle the non-contiguous form of X.cols(vector_of_column_indices)

    • expanded eigs_sym() and eigs_gen() with optional fine-grained parameters (subspace dimension, number of iterations, eigenvalues closest to specified value)

    • deprecated form of reshape() removed from Cube and SpMat classes

    • ignore and warn on use of the ARMA_DONT_USE_CXX11 macro

  • Switch Travis CI testing to focal and BSPM

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sat, 17 Oct 2020

digest 0.6.26: Blake3 and Tuning

And a new version of digest is now on CRAN will go to Debian shortly.

digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, spookyhash, and blake3 algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects. It is a fairly widely-used package (currently listed at 896k monthly downloads, 279 direct reverse dependencies and 8057 indirect reverse dependencies, or just under half of CRAN) as many tasks may involve caching of objects for which it provides convenient general-purpose hash key generation.

This release brings two nice contributed updates. Dirk Schumacher added support for blake3 (though we could probably push this a little harder for performance, help welcome). Winston Chang benchmarked and tuned some of the key base R parts of the package. Last but not least I flipped the vignette to the lovely minidown, updated the Travis CI setup using bspm (as previously blogged about in r4 #30), and added a package website using Matertial for MkDocs.

My CRANberries provides the usual summary of changes to the previous version.

For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/digest | permanent link

Wed, 14 Oct 2020

dang 0.0.12: Two new functions

A new release of the dang package is now on CRAN, roughly one year after the last release. The dang package regroups a few functions of mine that had no other home as for example lsos() from a StackOverflow question from 2009 (!!) is one, this overbought/oversold price band plotter from an older blog post is another. More recently added were helpers for data.table to xts conversion and a git repo root finder.

This release adds two functions. One was mentioned just days ago in a tweet by Nathan and is a reworked version of something Colin tweeted about a few weeks ago: a little data wrangling off the kewl rtweet to find maximally spammy accounts per search topic. In other words those who include more than ‘N’ hashtags for given search term. The other is something I, if memory serves, picked up a while back on one of the lists: a base R function to identify non-ASCII characters in a file. It is a C function that is not directly exported by and hence no accessible, so we put it here (with credits, of course). I mentioned it yesterday when announcing tidyCpp as I this C function was the starting point for the new tidyCpp wrapper around some C API of R functions.

The (very short) NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.0.12 (2020-10-14)

  • New functions muteTweets and checkPackageAsciiCode.

  • Updated CI setup.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/dang | permanent link

Tue, 13 Oct 2020

tidyCpp 0.0.1: New package

A new package arrived on CRAN a few days ago. It offers a few headers files which wrap (parts) of the C API for R, but in a form that may be a little easier to use for C++ programmers. I have always liked how in Rcpp we offer good parts of the standalone R Math library in a namespace R::. While working recently with a particular C routine (for checking non-ASCII characters that will be part of the next version of the dang package which collecting various goodies in one place), I realized there may be value in collecting a few more such wrappers. So I started a few simple ones starting from simple examples.

Currently we have five headers defines.h, globals.h, internals.h, math.h, and shield.h. The first four each correpond to an R header file of the same or similar name, and the last one brings a simple yet effective alternative to PROTECT and UNPROTECT from Rcpp (in a slightly simplified way). None of the headers are “complete”, for internals.h in particular a lot more could be added (as I noticed today when experimenting with another source file that may be converted). All of the headers can be accessed with a simple #include <tidyCpp> (which, following another C++ convention, does not have a .h or .hpp suffix). And a the package ships these headers, packages desiring to use them only need LinkingTo: tidyCpp.

As usage examples, we (right now) have four files in the snippets/ directory of the package. Two of these, convolveExample.cpp and dimnamesExample.cpp both illustrate how one could change example code from Writing R Extensions. Then there are also a very simple defineExample.cpp and a shieldExample.cpp illustrating how much easier Shield() is compared to PROTECT and UNPROTECT.

Finally, there is a nice vignette discussing the package motivation with two detailed side-by-side ‘before’ and ‘after’ examples that are the aforementioned convolution and dimnames examples.

Over time, I expect to add more definitions and wrappers. Feedback would be welcome—it seems to hit a nerve already as it currently has more stars than commits even though (prior to this post) I had yet to tweet or blog about it. Please post comments and suggestions at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/tidycpp | permanent link

Thu, 08 Oct 2020

RcppSimdJson 0.1.2: Upstream update

A new RcppSimdJson release arrived on CRAN yesterday bringing along the simdjson 0.5.0 release that happened a few weeks.

RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire and collaborators. Via very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle per byte parsed; see the video of the talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (also voted best talk).

Beside the upstream update, not too much happened to our package itself since 0.1.1 though Brandon did help one user to seriously speed up his JSON processing. The (this time very short) NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.1.2 (2020-10-07)

  • Upgraded to simdjson 0.5.0 (Dirk #49)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

For questions, suggestions, or issues please use the issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Wed, 07 Oct 2020

littler 0.3.12: Exciting updates

max-heap image

The thirteenth release of littler as a CRAN package became available today (after a three day ‘rest’ at CRAN for no real reason), following in the fourteen-ish year history as a package started by Jeff in 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later.

littler is the first command-line interface for R as it predates Rscript. It allows for piping as well for shebang scripting via #!, uses command-line arguments more consistently and still starts faster. It also always loaded the methods package which Rscript only started to do in recent years.

littler lives on Linux and Unix, has its difficulties on macOS due to yet-another-braindeadedness there (who ever thought case-insensitive filesystems as a default where a good idea?) and simply does not exist on Windows (yet – the build system could be extended – see RInside for an existence proof, and volunteers are welcome!). See the FAQ vignette on how to add it to your PATH.

A few examples are highlighted at the Github repo, as well as in the examples vignette.

This release brings five new example scripts and command wrappers:

  • installDeps.r installs all dependencies of package (directory or tarball)
  • installRSPM.r relies on RSPM to install binary packages
  • installBSPM.r relies on BSPM to install binary packages (esp. on Linux)
  • cranIncomimg.r checks the incoming queue for one or more packages
  • urlUpdates.r checks and/or updates stale URLs leading to redirects

A number of commands were also extended or updated (see below for more). We have a new and very slick documentation website once again utilising Material for MkDocs. Last but not least the two included vignettes now use minidown and the fabulous water css theme—which reduced the file sizes of the two vignettes from, respectively, 884kb and 873kb to 47kb and 15kb. Yes, that is correct. That alone brought the package file size down from 641kb to 116kb. Incredible.

The NEWS file entry is below.

Changes in littler version 0.3.12 (2020-10-04)

  • Changes in examples

    • Updates to scripts tt.r, cos.r, cow.r, c4r.r, com.r

    • New script installDeps.r to install dependencies

    • Several updates tp script check.r

    • New script installBSPM.r and installRSPM.r for binary package installation (Dirk and Iñaki in #81)

    • New script cranIncoming.r to check in Incoming

    • New script urlUpdate.r validates URLs as R does

  • Changes in package

    • Travis CI now uses BSPM

    • A package documentation website was added

    • Vignettes now use minidown resulting in much reduced filesizes: from over 800kb to under 50kb (Dirk in #83)

My CRANberries provides a comparison to the previous release. Full details for the littler release are provided as usual at the ChangeLog page, and now also on the new package docs website. The code is available via the GitHub repo, from tarballs and now of course also from its CRAN page and via install.packages("littler"). Binary packages are available directly in Debian as well as soon via Ubuntu binaries at CRAN thanks to the tireless Michael Rutter.

Comments and suggestions are welcome at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/littler | permanent link

Sat, 03 Oct 2020

pinp 0.0.10: More Tweaks

A new version of our pinp package arrived on CRAN two days ago, roughly one year after the previous release. The pinp package allows for snazzier one or two column Markdown-based pdf vignettes, and is now used by a few packages. A screenshot of the package vignette can be seen below. Additional screenshots are at the pinp page.

pinp vignette

This release adds another option for a customized date YAML variable suitable for e.g. a published at date thanks to Ilya Kashnitsky, has some tweaks to the README.md as well as support for pandoc columns mode (as a small extension of code from the nice repo by Grant McDermott).

The NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in pinp version 0.0.10 (2020-10-01)

  • New document_date YAML variable to optionally set a 'Published at' or alike date (Ilya Kashnitsky in #85).

  • Small tweaks to README.md (Dirk)

  • Support pandoc columns mode (Dirk in #88)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. More information is on the tint page. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/pinp | permanent link

Sun, 27 Sep 2020

pkgKitten 0.2.0: Now with tinytest and new docs

kitten

A new release 0.2.0 of pkgKitten just hit on CRAN today, or about eleven months after the previous release.

This release brings support for tinytest by having pkgKitten::kitten() automagically call tinytest::puppy() if the latter package is installed (and the user did not opt out of calling it). So your newly created minimal package now also uses a wonderful yet tiny testing framework. We also added a new documentation site using the previously tweeted-about wrapper for Material for MkDocs I really dig. And last but not least we switched to BSPM-based Continued Integration (which I wrote about yesterday in R4 #30) and fixed one bug regarding the default NAMESPACE file.

Changes in version 0.2.0 (2020-09-27)

  • Continuous Integration uses the updated BSPM-based script on Travis and with GitHub Actions (Dirk in #11 plus earlier commits).

  • A new default NAMESPACE file is now installed (Dirk in #12).

  • A package documentation website was added (Dirk in #13).

  • Call tinytest::puppy if installed and not opted out (Dirk in #14).

More details about the package are at the pkgKitten webpage, the (new) pkgKitten docs site, and the pkgKitten GitHub repo.

Courtesy of my CRANberries site, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/pkgkitten | permanent link

Sat, 26 Sep 2020

#30: Easy, Reliable, Fast and Portable Linux and macOS Continuous Integration

Welcome to the 30th post in the rarified R recommendation resources series or R4 for short. The last post introduced BSPM. In the four weeks since, we have worked some more on BSPM to bring it to the point where it is ready for use with continuous integration. Building on this, it is now used inside the run.sh script that driven our CI use for many years (via the r-travis repo).

Which we actually use right now on three different platforms:

All three use the exact same script facilitating this, and run a ‘matrix’ over Linux and macOS. You read this right: one CI setup that is portable and which you can take to your CI provider of choice. No lock-in or tie-in. Use what works, change at will. Or run on all three if you like burning extra cycles.

This is already used by handful of my repos as well as by at least two repos of friends also deploying r-travis. How does it work? In a nutshell we are

  • downloading run.sh via curl and changing its mode;
  • running run.sh bootstrap which sets the operating system default:
    • on Linux we use Ubuntu,
      • add two PPAs repos for R itself and over 4600 r-cran-* binaries,
      • and enable BSPM to use these from install.packages()
    • on macOS we use the standard setup also used on Travis, GitHub Actions and elsewhere;
    • this provides us with fast, reliable, easy, and portable access to binaries on two OSs under dependency resolution;
  • running run.sh install_deps to install just the requireded Depends:, Imports: and LinkingTo:
  • running run.sh tests to build the tarball and test it via R CMD check --as-cran.

There are several customizations that are possible via environment variables

  • additional PPAs or drat repos can be added to offer even more package choice;
  • alternatively one could run run.sh install_all to also install Suggests:;
  • optionally one could run run.sh install_r pkgA pkgB ... to install packages explicitly listed;
  • optionally one could also run run.sh install_aptget r-cran-pkga r-cran-pkgb otherpackage to add more Ubuntu binaries.

We find this setup compelling. The scheme is simple: there really is just one shell script behind it which can also be downloaded and altered. The scheme is also portable as we can (as shown) rotate between CI provides. The scheme is also more flexible: in case of debugging needs one can simply run the script on a local Docker or VM instance. Lastly, the scheme moves away from single points of failure or breakage.

Currently the script uses only BSPM as I had the hunch that it would a) work and b) be compelling. Adding support for RSPM would be equally easy, but I have no immediate need to do so. Adding BioConductor installation may be next. That is easy when BioConductor uses r-release; it may be little more challenging under r-devel to but it should work too. Stay tuned.

In the meantime, if the above sounds compelling, give run.sh from r-travis a go!

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/r4 | permanent link

Sun, 20 Sep 2020

RcppSpdlog 0.0.2: New upstream, awesome new stopwatch

Following up on the initial RcppSpdlog 0.0.1 release earlier this week, we are pumped to announce release 0.0.2. It contains upstream version 1.8.0 for spdlog which utilizes (among other things) a new feature in the embedded fmt library, namely completely automated formatting of high resolution time stamps which allows for gems like this (taken from this file in the package and edited down for brevity):

    spdlog::stopwatch sw;                                   // instantiate a stop watch

    // some other code

    sp->info("Elapsed time: {}", sw);

What we see is all there is: One instantiates a stopwatch object, and simply references it. The rest, as they say, is magic. And we get tic / toc alike behaviour in modern C++ at essentially no cost us (as code authors). So nice. Output from the (included in the package) function exampleRsink() (again edited down just a little):

R> RcppSpdlog::exampleRsink()
[13:03:23.845114] [fromR] [I] [thread 793264] Welcome to spdlog!
[...]
[13:03:23.845205] [fromR] [I] [thread 793264] Elapsed time: 0.000103611
[...]
[13:03:23.845281] [fromR] [I] [thread 793264] Elapsed time: 0.00018203
R> 

We see that the two simple logging instances come 10 and 18 microseconds into the call.

RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovic.

The NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in RcppSpdlog version 0.0.2 (2020-09-17)

  • Upgraded to upstream release 1.8.0

  • Switched Travis CI to using BSPM, also test on macOS

  • Added 'stopwatch' use to main R sink example

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppSpdlog page.

The only sour grapes, again, are once more over the CRAN processing. And just how 0.0.1 was delayed for no good reason for three weeks, 0.0.2 was delayed by three days just because … well that is how CRAN rules sometimes. I’d be even more mad if I had an alternative but I don’t. We remain grateful for all they do but they really could have let this one through even at one-day update delta. Ah well, now we’re three days wiser and of course nothing changed in the package.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Wed, 16 Sep 2020

RcppSpdlog 0.0.1: New and Exciting Logging Package

Very thrilled to announce a new package RcppSpdlog which is now on CRAN in its first release 0.0.1. We had tweeted once about the earliest version which had already caught the eyes of Gabi upstream.

RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovic.

I had meant to package this for a few years now but didn’t find an (easy, elegant) way to completely lift stdout / stderr and related uses which R wants us to remove for smoother operations from R itself including synchronized input/output. It was only a few weeks ago that I realized I should subclass a logger (or, more concretely, a sink for a logger) which could then use R input/output. With the right idea the implementaton was easy, and [Gabi]((https://github.com/gabime) was most helpful in making sure R CMD check would not see one or two remaining C++ i/o operations (which we currently do by not activating a default logger, and substituing REprintf() in one call). So this is now clean and sween and a simple use is included in an example in the package we can show here too (in slightly shorter form minus the documentation header):

// this portmanteau include also defines the r_sink we use below, and which
// diverts all logging to R via the Rcpp::Rcout replacement for std::cout
#include <RcppSpdlog>

// [[Rcpp::export]]
void exampleRsink() {

    std::string logname = "fromR";                          // fix a name for this logger
    auto sp = spdlog::get(logname);                         // retrieve existing one
    if (sp == nullptr) sp = spdlog::r_sink_mt(logname);     // or create new one if needed

    // change log pattern (changed from [%H:%M:%S %z] [%n] [%^---%L---%$] )
    sp->set_pattern("[%H:%M:%S.%f] [%n] [%^%L%$] [thread %t] %v");

    sp->info("Welcome to spdlog!");
    sp->error("Some error message with arg: {}", 1);

    sp->warn("Easy padding in numbers like {:08d}", 12);
    sp->critical("Support for int: {0:d};  hex: {0:x};  oct: {0:o}; bin: {0:b}", 42);
    sp->info("Support for floats {:03.2f}", 1.23456);
    sp->info("Positional args are {1} {0}..", "too", "supported");
    sp->info("{:<30}", "left aligned");

}

The NEWS entry for the first release follows.

Changes in RcppSpdlog version 0.0.1 (2020-09-08)

  • Initial release with added R/Rcpp logging sink example

The only sour grapes, if any, are over the CRAN processing. This was originally uploaded three weeks ago. As a new package, it got extra attention and some truly idiosyncratic attention to two details that were already supplied in the first uploaded version. Yet it needed two rounds of going back and forth for really no great net gain, yet wasting a week each time. I am not all that impressed by this, and not particularly pleased either, but I presume is the “tax” we all pay in order to enjoy the unsurpassed richness of the CRAN repository system which continues to work just flawlessly.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sun, 06 Sep 2020

inline 0.3.16: Now with system2()

A new minor release of the inline package just arrived on CRAN. inline facilitates writing code in-line in simple string expressions or short files. The package is mature and stable, and can be considered to be in maintenance mode: Rcpp used it extensively in the vrey early days before Rcpp Attributes provided an even better alternative. Seveal other package still rely on inline.

One of these package is rstan, and Ben Goodrich updated our use of system() to system2() allowing for better error diagnostics. We also did a bit of standard maintenance to Travis CI and the README.md file.

See below for a detailed list of changes extracted from the NEWS file.

Changes in inline version 0.3.16 (2020-09-06)

  • Maintenance updates to README.md standardizing badges (Dirk).

  • Maintenance update to Travis CI setup (Dirk).

  • Switch to using system2() for better error diagnostics (Ben Goodrich in #12).

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/inline | permanent link

Fri, 04 Sep 2020

nanotime 0.3.2: Tweaks

Another (minor) nanotime release, now at version 0.3.2. This release brings an endianness correction which was kindly contributed in a PR, switches to using the API header exported by RcppCCTZ, and tweaks test coverage a little with respect to r-devel.

nanotime relies on the RcppCCTZ package for (efficient) high(er) resolution time parsing and formatting up to nanosecond resolution, and the bit64 package for the actual integer64 arithmetic. Initially implemented using the S3 system, it has benefitted greatly from work by co-author Leonardo who not only rejigged nanotime internals in S4 but also added new S4 types for periods, intervals and durations.

The NEWS snippet adds full details.

Changes in version 0.3.2 (2020-09-03)

  • Correct for big endian (Elliott Sales de Andrade in #81).

  • Use the RcppCCTZ_API.h header (Dirk in #82).

  • Conditionally reduce test coverage (Dirk in #83).

Thanks to CRANberries there is also a diff to the previous version. More details and examples are at the nanotime page; code, issue tickets etc at the GitHub repository.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/nanotime | permanent link

Thu, 03 Sep 2020

RcppArmadillo 0.9.900.3.0

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 769 other packages on CRAN.

A few days ago, Conrad released a new minor version 9.900.3 of Armadillo which we packaged and tested as usual. Given the incremental release character, we only tested the release and not candidate release. No regressions were found, and, as usual, logs from reverse-depends runs are in the rcpp-logs repo.

All changes in the new release are noted below.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.9.900.3.0 (2020-09-02)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 9.900.3 (Nocturnal Misbehaviour)

    • More efficient code for initialising matrices with fill::zeros

    • Fixes for various error messages

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sun, 30 Aug 2020

RcppCCTZ 0.2.9: API Header Added

A new minor release 0.2.9 of RcppCCTZ is now on CRAN.

RcppCCTZ uses Rcpp to bring CCTZ to R. CCTZ is a C++ library for translating between absolute and civil times using the rules of a time zone. In fact, it is two libraries. One for dealing with civil time: human-readable dates and times, and one for converting between between absolute and civil times via time zones. And while CCTZ is made by Google(rs), it is not an official Google product. The RcppCCTZ page has a few usage examples and details. This package was the first CRAN package to use CCTZ; by now at least three others do—using copies in their packages which remains less than ideal.

This version adds a header file for the recently-exported three functions.

Changes in version 0.2.9 (2020-08-30)

  • Provide a header RcppCCZT_API.h for client packages.
  • Show a simple example of parsing a YYYYMMDD HHMMSS.FFFFFF date.

We also have a diff to the previous version thanks to CRANberries. More details are at the RcppCCTZ page; code, issue tickets etc at the GitHub repository.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link