Tue, 22 Nov 2022

spdl 0.0.1 on CRAN: New Package!

A new package made it to CRAN today: spdl. It provides a very simple interface to spdlog with the key focus being that provides the same interface from both R and C++. I had brought spdlog to R a little while ago via RcppSpdlog, but its use was generally limited to C++ code where we would write something like (taken from one of the examples included in the package)

spdlog::info("Welcome to spdlog!");

I then provided C-level exports from the package accessible in other package but with that the signature only became longer as it also included the package name, here RcppSpdlog. So I experimented a little with that and added another ‘more compactly named’ namespace spdl around it. So then it becomes

spdl::info("Info message with values {} and {}", 42, 1.23);  // C++ code

which now also shows the power of the included fmt library. And I got quite used to that … and now wanted to same from R! But to create a new namespace, we need a new package. So … we made one. Now from R too:

spdl::info("Info message with values {} and {}", 42L, 1.23)  # R code

We layered a very simple wrapper for fmt over this. All R argument are passed to format() and we simply send a vector of strings over the C interface to the RcppSpdlog package where the templated formatter of fmt is invoked – but for character values. You can equally well format the string locally first. Everything works: from paste() to sprintf() to any of the existing string interpolators all of which are nice. But none works just like fmt and I wanted to have the same formatter in both languages, and like how fmt works.

By tradition, the NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in spld version 0.0.1 (2022-11-21)

  • Initial release of R and C++ loggers using spdl::* namespace

More detailed information is on the spdl page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/spdl | permanent link

Mon, 21 Nov 2022

RcppClassic 0.9.13 on CRAN: Minor Update

A maintenance release 0.9.14 of the RcppClassic package arrived earlier today on CRAN. This package provides a maintained version of the otherwise deprecated initial Rcpp API which no new projects should use as the normal Rcpp API is so much better.

The changes is. CRAN was reporting (for all four macOS builds, and only there) that an absolute path was embedded, so we updated the (old …) call to install_name_tool use on that (and only that) OS. No other changes were made.

CRANberries also reports the changes relative to the previous release from nearly three years ago.

Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Thu, 17 Nov 2022

RcppSpdlog 0.0.10 on CRAN: New Features

A version 0.0.10 of RcppSpdlog is now on CRAN and in Debian. RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovich.

This release continues on the path started less than two weeks ago with the RcppSpdlog 0.0.9 release. We continue to support both R and C++ access by adding a (simple) variadic template formatter exposing fmt::format() (by focusing on just string arguments). This can be accessed from R via the exact same formatting strings that fmt uses, and which we have come to like for its simplicity. Of course if one prefers a different string interpolation method, or plain sprintf(), or even paste: they all work as all that matters is that a character variable gets passed on. We also added a little bit of new documentation in the vignette.

The NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in RcppSpdlog version 0.0.10 (2022-11-17)

  • Support variadic templates with fmt::format

  • Add R formatting helper which converts arguments to character taking advantage of variadic template logger: fmt logging from R

  • Expand vignette

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report. More detailed information is on the RcppSpdlog page, or the package documention site.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Wed, 09 Nov 2022

RcppArmadillo 0.11.4.2.1 on CRAN: Updates

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 1027 packages other packages on CRAN, downloaded 26.9 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 503 times according to Google Scholar.

This release reflect as new upstream bugfix release 11.4.2 made recently by Conrad. To accomodate CRAN and their preference for at most a release per month, we held it back since the 11.4.0 release early October. As we usually do, we generally update once upstream Armadillo releases are made. When we do not immediately release to CRAN (in order to lower the release cadence), we make those “interim” releases available via GitHub source and the Rcpp drat repo.

This release also brings a rearranged, and as we think, simplified layout of the header files. All existing locations are still supported but we will be starting a (very patient and slow) transition at some point.

The full set of changes (since the last CRAN release 0.11.4.0.1) follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.11.4.2.1 (2022-11-08)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 11.4.2 (Ship of Theseus)

    • more robust handling of corner cases in multi-threaded contexts
  • Internal header organisation with new sub-directories while providing full compatibility via existing paths (#395 #396)

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.11.4.1.0 (2022-10-10) (GitHub Only)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 11.4.1 (Ship of Theseus)

    • fix data race in Cube::slice()

    • workarounds for false warnings emitted by GCC 12 when compiling with FORTIFY_SOURCE enabled (already in RcppArmadillo 0.11.4.0.1 too)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sun, 06 Nov 2022

RcppCCTZ 0.2.12 on CRAN: Maintenance

A new release 0.2.12 of RcppCCTZ is now on CRAN.

RcppCCTZ uses Rcpp to bring CCTZ to R. CCTZ is a C++ library for translating between absolute and civil times using the rules of a time zone. In fact, it is two libraries. One for dealing with civil time: human-readable dates and times, and one for converting between between absolute and civil times via time zones. And while CCTZ is made by Google(rs), it is not an official Google product. The RcppCCTZ page has a few usage examples and details. This package was the first CRAN package to use CCTZ; by now several others packages (four the last time we counted) include its sources too. Not ideal, but beyond our control.

This version adds support for NA values when parsing, and updates GitHub Action.

Changes in version 0.2.12 (2022-11-06)

  • Support NA values in numerical or character input

  • GitHub Actions were updated to checkout version 3.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat to the previous version. More details are at the RcppCCTZ page; code, issue tickets etc at the GitHub repository.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sat, 05 Nov 2022

RcppEigen 0.3.3.9.3 on CRAN: Maintenance

A new release 0.3.3.9.3 of RcppEigen arrived on CRAN moments ago (and just went to Debian). Eigen is a C++ template library for linear algebra: matrices, vectors, numerical solvers, and related algorithms.

This update is again mostly maintenance. To accomodate one small aspect of the Fortran interface, we now require R 3.6.0 or later. Jonah Gabry spotted a really old typo and fixed it. The fastLm support code now uses the unabbreviated df.residual. We accomodated clang-15 in one signature as is common with many recent uploads, and also updated one aspect of GitHub Actions.

And once again as we said for the last four releases:

One additional and recent change was the accomodation of a recent CRAN Policy change to not allow gcc or clang to mess with diagnostic messages. A word of caution: this may make your compilation of packages using RcppEigen very noisy so consider adding -Wno-ignored-attributes to the compiler flags added in your ~/.R/Makevars.

We still find this requirement rather annoying. Eigen is only usable if you set, say,

-Wno-deprecated-declarations -Wno-parentheses -Wno-ignored-attributes -Wno-unused-function

asoptions in~/.R/Makevars`. But CRAN makes the rules. Maybe if a few of us gently and politely nudge them they may relent one day. One can only hope.

The complete NEWS file entry follows.

Changes in RcppEigen version 0.3.3.9.3 (2022-11-04)

  • The dependency on R is now versioned to 3.6.0 or later for support for USE_FC_LEN_T from Fortran.

  • An old example typo was corrected (Jonah Gabry in #114).

  • The fastLm methods now reference df.residual by its full name (Closes #115).

  • A function prototype was updated for clang-15.

  • GitHub Actions were updated to checkout version 3.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the most recent release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Fri, 04 Nov 2022

RcppSpdlog 0.0.9 on CRAN: Extended Usability and New Upstream

A brand-new version 0.0.9 of RcppSpdlog got onto CRAN overnight. RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovich.

This release contains two changes. First, we extend usability by offering both a set of simple R functions for logging from R, and a matching set of functions at the C++ level that are directly callable (and exported) from this package (so that client packages do not need to compile). Both these changes are described (as sections seven and eight) in the vignette. Second, while we were working on this Gabi released version 1.11.0 upstream so we included this as well.

The NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in RcppSpdlog version 0.0.9 (2022-11-04)

  • Add both an R and an C++ interface to spdlog

  • Update GitHub Actions to checkout@v3

  • Add a shorter aliased namespace for C++

  • Upgraded to upstream releases spdlog 1.11.0

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report. More detailed information is on the RcppSpdlog page, or the package documention site.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Thu, 03 Nov 2022

RProtoBuf 0.4.20 on CRAN: Maintenance

A new release 0.4.20 of RProtoBuf arrived on CRAN earlier today. RProtoBuf provides R with bindings for the Google Protocol Buffers (“ProtoBuf”) data encoding and serialization library used and released by Google, and deployed very widely in numerous projects as a language and operating-system agnostic protocol.

This release is somewhat mechanical and in the spirit of many other recent releases. clang-15 is, as more recent compilers do, more stringent on definitions and wants to see some void in argument-less signatures. Happy to oblige. At the same time, GitHub Actions started to nag us about minimum versions of node code so an upgrade to a newer action is warranted, again as with many other affected packages. We also found another http:// URL hiding somewhere so that was cleaned. Lastly, it appears Protocol Buffers themselves moved on and now need / prefer C++17 so were happy to oblige.

The following section from the NEWS.Rd file has full details.

Changes in RProtoBuf version 0.4.20 (2022-11-02)

  • Two function prototype were updated for clang-15.

  • GitHub Actions were updated to checkout version 3.

  • One more http:// URL was updated to https://

  • The package compilation is now donw with C++17 as the Protocol Buffer headers require it (and clang-15 nags otherwise).

Thanks to my CRANberries, there is a diff to the previous release. The RProtoBuf page has copies of the (older) package vignette, the ‘quick’ overview vignette, and the pre-print of our JSS paper. Questions, comments etc should go to the GitHub issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rprotobuf | permanent link

Tue, 01 Nov 2022

tint 0.1.4 on CRAN: Miscellaneous Updates

A new version 0.1.4 of the tint package arrived at CRAN today. tint provides a style ‘not unlike Tufte’ for use in html and pdf documents created from markdown. The github repo shows several examples in its README, more as usual in the package documentation.

This is the first release in over two years and it brings a few incremental changes which are described in detail below. The trigger was an email from CRAN desiring compacted pdf files inside the package sources. Which, coincidentally, was made a default about a year ago in the build.r script from littler I use to make packages. But as we had not updated tint this has not reached CRAN. So there.

The set of changes follows, which includes a helpful contributed PR for which we are always thankful. I also improved table rendering, most other changes are packaging mechanics.

Changes in tint version 0.1.4 (2022-11-01)

  • Added continuous integration at GitHub using run.sh

  • Non-margin reference in html mode now have an improved display (David Selby and Dirk in #47)

  • The LaTeX package array is now installed for improved table support (Dirk addressing #48)

  • Minor updates made the package directory and README.md

  • GitHub Actions were updated to checkout version 3.

  • Several http:// URLs were updated to https://

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. More information is on the tint page.

For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/tint | permanent link

RcppXts 0.0.5 on CRAN: Maintenance

A new maintenance release 0.0.6 of RcppXts is now on CRAN. The RcppXts package demonstrates how to access the export C API of xts which we contributed a looong time ago.

This release, like so many these days, was triggered by clang-15 wanting to see a void in an otherwise argument-less signature. We also updated a GitHub Action to avoid another nag from there.

The NEWS entries follow.

Changes in version 0.0.6 (2022-08-05)

  • One function prototype was updated for clang-15.

  • GitHub Actions were updated to checkout version 3.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release. A bit more information about the package is available here as well as at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Mon, 31 Oct 2022

RcppRedis 0.2.2 on CRAN: Maintenance and Enhancement

A new minor release 0.2.2 of our RcppRedis package arrived on CRAN this evening. RcppRedis is one of several packages connecting R to the fabulous Redis in-memory datastructure store (and much more). RcppRedis does not pretend to be feature complete, but it may do some things faster than the other interfaces, and also offers an optional coupling with MessagePack binary (de)serialization via RcppMsgPack. The package has carried production loads for several years now.

This packages now brings a neat enhancement to the real-time data plotter code (and example) I have been using with for a while now. Paul Murrell kindly suggested dev.hold() and dev.flush() when I inquired how to minimize ‘flicker’ from frequent updated. And this is perfect. I can now keep several data displays ‘on’ during market hours without being distracted by ‘flicker’. It just updates, smooth as silk. Also included in the release are the usual two updates so en vogue these days: a (sole) sprinkling of void to appease clang-15, and an update the GitHub Action for checkout. Both silence some nags we would rather not see.

The detailed changes list follows.

Changes in version 0.2.2 (2022-10-31)

  • Thanks to a suggestion by Paul Murrell, the real-time chart demo now uses dev.hold() and.flush() for flicker-free updates.

  • One function prototype was updated for clang-15.

  • GitHub Actions were updated to checkout version 3.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release. More information is on the RcppRedis page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sun, 30 Oct 2022

RcppGSL 0.3.12 on CRAN: Maintenance

A new release 0.3.12 of RcppGSL is now on CRAN. The RcppGSL package provides an interface from R to the GNU GSL by relying on the Rcpp package.

This release accomodates, just like so many other releases this week, the more stringent views of clang-15 about what a correct function prototype is. While we were at it, an updatet to GitHub Actions was made as well.

The NEWS entry follows:

Changes in version 0.3.12 (2022-10-30)

  • Two function prototypes were updated for clang-15.

  • GitHub Actions were updated to checkout version 3.

Courtesy of CRANberries, a summary of changes in the most recent release is also available.

More information is on the RcppGSL page. Questions, comments etc should go to the issue tickets at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

RcppBDT 0.2.6 on CRAN: Maintenance

A minor maintenance release for the RcppBDT package is now on CRAN.

The RcppBDT package is an early adopter of Rcpp and was one of the first packages utilizing Boost and its Date_Time library. The now more widely-used package anytime is a direct descentant of RcppBDT.

This release accomodates, just like so many other releases this week, the more stringent views of clang-15 about what a correct function prototype is. While we were at it, an updatet to GitHub Actions was made as well.

The NEWS entry follows:

Changes in version 0.2.6 (2022-10-30)

  • A function prototype was updated for clang-15.

  • GitHub Actions were updated to checkout version 3.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

RApiDatetime 0.0.7 on CRAN: Maintenance

A new release of our RApiDatetime package is now on CRAN.

RApiDatetime provides a number of entry points for C-level functions of the R API for Date and Datetime calculations. The functions asPOSIXlt and asPOSIXct convert between long and compact datetime representation, formatPOSIXlt and Rstrptime convert to and from character strings, and POSIXlt2D and D2POSIXlt convert between Date and POSIXlt datetime. Lastly, asDatePOSIXct converts to a date type. All these functions are rather useful, but were not previously exported by R for C-level use by other packages. Which this package aims to change.

This release accomodates, just like so many other releases this week, the more stringent views of clang-15 about what a correct function prototype is. While we were at, updates to GitHub Actions and https URL were made as well.

Changes in RApiDatetime version 0.0.7 (2022-10-30)

  • A function prototype was updated for clang-15.

  • GitHub Actions were updated to checkout version 3.

  • Several remaining http:// URLs were converted to https://.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is are comparisons to the previous release. More information is on the rapidatetime page.

For questions or comments please use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rapidatetime | permanent link

Sat, 29 Oct 2022

littler 0.3.17 on CRAN: Maintenance

max-heap image

The eighteenth release of littler as a CRAN package just landed, following in the now sixteen year history (!!) as a package started by Jeff in 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later.

littler is the first command-line interface for R as it predates Rscript. It allows for piping as well for shebang scripting via #!, uses command-line arguments more consistently and still starts faster. It also always loaded the methods package which Rscript only started to do in recent years.

littler lives on Linux and Unix, has its difficulties on macOS due to yet-another-braindeadedness there (who ever thought case-insensitive filesystems as a default were a good idea?) and simply does not exist on Windows (yet – the build system could be extended – see RInside for an existence proof, and volunteers are welcome!). See the FAQ vignette on how to add it to your PATH. A few examples are highlighted at the Github repo, as well as in the examples vignette.

This release, coming just a few weeks since the last release in August, heeds to clang-15 a updates one signature to a proper interface. It also contains one kindly contributed patch updating install2.r (and installBioc.r) to cope with a change in R-devel.

The full change description follows.

Changes in littler version 0.3.17 (2022-10-29)

  • Changes in package

    • An internal function prototype was updated for clang-15.
  • Changes in examples

    • The install2.r and installBioc. were updated for an update in R-devel (Tatsuya Shima and Dirk in #104).

My CRANberries service provides a comparison to the previous release. Full details for the littler release are provided as usual at the ChangeLog page, and also on the package docs website. The code is available via the GitHub repo, from tarballs and now of course also from its CRAN page and via install.packages("littler"). Binary packages are available directly in Debian as well as soon via Ubuntu binaries at CRAN thanks to the tireless Michael Rutter.

Comments and suggestions are welcome at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/littler | permanent link

gettz 0.0.5 on CRAN: Maintenance

A minor routine update 0.0.5 of gettz arrived on CRAN overnight.

gettz provides a possible fallback in situations where Sys.timezone() fails to determine the system timezone. That happened when e.g. the file /etc/localtime somehow is not a link into the corresponding file with zoneinfo data in, say, /usr/share/zoneinfo. Since the package was written (in the fall of 2016), R added a similar extended heuristic approach itself.

This release updates a function signature to satisfy the more stringent tests by clang-15, updates the GitHub Action checkout code to suppress a nag, and changes a few remaining http documentation links to https. As with the previous releses: No functional changes, no new code, or new features.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release.

More information is on the gettz page. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/gettz | permanent link

Thu, 27 Oct 2022

RcppAnnoy 0.0.20 on CRAN: Maintenance

annoy image

Another minor maintenance release, now at version 0.0.20, of RcppAnnoy has arrived on CRAN. RcppAnnoy is the Rcpp-based R integration of the nifty Annoy library by Erik Bernhardsson. Annoy is a small and lightweight C++ template header library for very fast approximate nearest neighbours—originally developed to drive the Spotify music discovery algorithm.

This release only contains internal changes to please, respectively clang-15 and (macOS) Xcode 14 (one of which PRed upstream too). No changes in package functionality. Detailed changes follow.

Changes in version 0.0.20 (2022-10-27)

  • Minor tweaks to appease clang-15 and Xcode 14

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 25 Oct 2022

RQuantLib 0.4.17 on CRAN: Maintenance

A new release 0.4.17 of RQuantLib arrived at CRAN earlier today, and has been uploaded to Debian as well.

QuantLib is a very comprehensice free/open-source library for quantitative finance; RQuantLib connects it to the R environment and language.

The release of RQuantLib comes five months after the previous maintenance, and brings a somewhat humurous upgrade from a default C++ standard of C++11 to C++14. We waited so long for C++11 to become available for R (which happened “eventually” when g++ 4.9 was no longer the default on Windows) and now it has become a constraint!! QuantLib 1.28, released today actually switched to C++14 as a minimum required. R also supports this as the default, but we still had C++11 hardwired so this quick maintenance release does away with that.

Changes in RQuantLib version 0.4.17 (2022-10-25)

  • Switch compilation to C++14 which is required by QuantLib 1.28 and, while standard with R 4.2.*, may be needed for R 4.1.*

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the this release. As always, more detailed information is on the RQuantLib page. Questions, comments etc should go to the new rquantlib-devel mailing list. Issue tickets can be filed at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rquantlib | permanent link

Mon, 24 Oct 2022

nanotime 0.3.7 on CRAN: Enhancements

A new version of our nanotime package arrived at CRAN today as version 0.3.7. nanotime relies on the RcppCCTZ package (as well as the RcppDate package for additional C++ operations) and offers efficient high(er) resolution time parsing and formatting up to nanosecond resolution, and the bit64 package for the actual integer64 arithmetic. Initially implemented using the S3 system, it has benefitted greatly from a rigorous refactoring by Leonardo who not only rejigged nanotime internals in S4 but also added new S4 types for periods, intervals and durations.

This release adds a few more operators, plus some other fixes, that were contributed in several PRs by Trevor Davis. The NEWS snippet has the full details.

Changes in version 0.3.7 (2022-10-23)

  • Update mkdocs for material docs generator (Dirk in #102)

  • Use inherits() instead comparing to class() (Trevor Davis in #104)

  • Set default arguments in nanoduration() (Trevor Davis in #105)

  • Add as.nanoduration.difftime() support (Trevor Davis in #106)

  • Add +/- methods for nanotime and difftime objects (Trevor Davis in #110 closing #108, #107)

Thanks to my CRANberries there is also a diff to the previous version. More details and examples are at the nanotime page; code, issue tickets etc at the GitHub repository – and all documentation is provided at the nanotime documentation site.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/nanotime | permanent link

Sun, 23 Oct 2022

RDieHarder 0.2.4 on CRAN: Packaging Updates

An new version 0.2.4 of the random-number generator tester RDieHarder (based on the DieHarder suite developed / maintained by Robert Brown with contributions by David Bauer and myself along with other contributors) is now on CRAN.

This release comes ten months after the previous release 0.2.3. It is once more related to R and requested CRAN changes as clang-15 brings additional warnings concerning -Wstrict-prototyping. This make use of C more solid, but it was a metric ton of work (see pull request #8).

Thanks to CRANberries, you can also look at the most recent diff.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rdieharder | permanent link

Wed, 19 Oct 2022

qlcal 0.0.3 on CRAN: Maintenance and Updates

The third release of the still pretty new qlcal package arrivied at CRAN today.

qlcal is based on the calendaring subset of QuantLib. It is provided (for the R package) as a set of included files, so the package is self-contained and does not depend on an external QuantLib library (which can be demanding to build). qlcal covers over sixty country / market calendars and can compute holiday lists, its complement (i.e. business day lists) and much more.

This release fixes a small bug affecting one function, brings calendar updates from QuantLib 1.27 and 1.28, and applies a little bit of polish to appease clang++-15.

Changes in version 0.0.3 (2022-10-19)

  • Correct the isBusinessDay() functionality (Fixes #2)

  • Update Australia and Saudi Arabia calendars from QuantLib 1.27

  • Update United Kingdom calendar from QuantLib 1.28

  • Convert one source file to utf-8 to appease clang-15

See the project page and package documentation for more details, and more examples.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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RcppQuantuccia 0.1.1 on CRAN: Maintenance

A minor release of RcppQuantuccia arrived on CRAN today. RcppQuantuccia started from the Quantuccia header-only subset / variant of QuantLib which it brings it to R. This project validated the idea of making the calendaring functionality of QuantLib available in a more compact and standalone project – which we now do with qlcal which can be seen as a successor to this.

This release merely updates a source file to proper encoding as clang++-15 would otherwise warn.

The complete list changes for this release follows.

Changes in version 0.1.1 (2022-10-19)

  • Minor code reorganization splitting off calendars.cpp

  • Convert the Argentinian calendar sources files as utf-8 to appease clang++-15

  • Advertise the qlcal package as an alternative

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report relative to the previous release. More information is on the RcppQuantuccia page. Issues and bugreports should go to the GitHub issue tracker.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Tue, 18 Oct 2022

RcppSimdJson 0.1.8 on CRAN: Maintenance

The RcppSimdJson package was just updated to release 0.1.8 today.

RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire and collaborators. Via very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle per byte parsed; see the video of the talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon.

This release simply changes one statement to not trigger a warning under clang++-14.

The very short NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in version 0.1.8 (2022-10-18)

  • Use the '||' operator instead of '|' on a set of booleans to appease 'clang-14'.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release. For questions, suggestions, or issues please use the issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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digest 0.6.30 on CRAN: More Package Maintenance

Release 0.6.30 of the digest package arrived at CRAN earlier today, and was just uploaded to Debian as well.

digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, spookyhash, and blake3 algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects. It is a mature and widely-used as many tasks may involve caching of objects for which it provides convenient general-purpose hash key generation to quickly identify the various objects.

This release contains two tiny changes on old standard C code to appease the new / upcoming clang-15 release now used by CRAN in their forward-looking checks.

My CRANberries provides the usual summary of changes to the previous version. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Wed, 12 Oct 2022

GitHub Streak: Round Nine

Eight years ago I referenced the Seinfeld Streak used in an earlier post of regular updates to to the Rcpp Gallery:

This is sometimes called Jerry Seinfeld’s secret to productivity: Just keep at it. Don’t break the streak.

and then showed the first chart of GitHub streaking 366 days:

github activity october 2013 to october 2014

And seven years ago a first follow-up appeared in this post about 731 days:

github activity october 2014 to october 2015

And six years ago we had a followup at 1096 days

github activity october 2015 to october 2016

And five years ago we had another one marking 1461 days

github activity october 2016 to october 2017

And four years ago another one for 1826 days

github activity october 2017 to october 2018

And three years ago another one bringing it to 2191 days

github activity october 2018 to october 2019

And two years ago another one bringing it to 2557 days

github activity october 2019 to october 2020

And last year another one bringing it to 2922 days

github activity october 2020 to october 2021

And as today is October 12 here is the newest one from 2021 to 2022 one bringing it 3287 days:

github activity october 2021 to october 2022

As always, special thanks go to Alessandro Pezzè for the Chrome add-on GithubOriginalStreak.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Thu, 06 Oct 2022

Rblpapi 0.3.14: Updates and Extensions

bloomberg terminal

Version 0.3.14 of the Rblpapi package arrived on CRAN earlier today. Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required).

This is the fourteenth release since the package first appeared on CRAN in 2016. It comprises a nice PR from Robert Harlow extending support to B-PIPE authentication (for those who have it) along with a few fixes made since the last release in January. The last one provided from a kind assist by Tomas Kalibera who pointed out how to overcome an absolute ‘rpath’ dynamic linker instruction (and as I noticed noticed something I already did in another package – ah well) so that we no longer require StagedInstall: yes.

The detailed list of changes follow below.

Changes in Rblpapi version 0.3.14 (2022-10-05)

  • Build configuration was generalized to consider local copies of library and headers (Dirk in #362)

  • A ticker symbol was corrected (Dirk in #368 addressing an issue #366 and #367)

  • Support for B-PIPE was added (Robert Harlow in #369 closing #342)

  • The package no longer requires staged installation thanks to an assist from Tomas Kalibera (Dirk in #373)

  • The retired package fts is no longer suggested (Dirk in #374 closing #372)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the this release. As always, more detailed information is on the Rblpapi page. Questions, comments etc should go to the issue tickets system at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rblpapi | permanent link

Wed, 05 Oct 2022

RVowpalWabbit 0.0.17: Maintenance

Almost to the week one year since the last maintenance release, we can announce another maintenance release, now at version 0.0.17, of the RVowpalWabbit package. The CRAN maintainers kindly and politly pointed out that I was (cough, cough) apparently the last maintainer who had packages that set StagedInstall: no. Guilty as charged.

RVowpalWabbit is one the two packages; the other one will hopefully follow ‘shortly’. And while I long suspected linking aspects to drive this (this is an old package, newer R packaging of the awesome VowpalWabbit is in rvw, I was plain wrong here. The cause was an absolute path to an included dataset, computed in an example, which then gets serialized. As Tomas Kalibera suggested, we can replace the constant with a function and all is well. So here is 0.0.17.

As noted before, there is a newer package rvw based on the excellent GSoC 2018 and beyond work by Ivan Pavlov (mentored by James and myself) so if you are into VowpalWabbit from R go check it out.

CRANberries provides a summary of changes to the previous version. More information is on the RVowpalWabbit page. Issues and bugreports should go to the GitHub issue tracker.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rvowpalwabbit | permanent link

Sun, 02 Oct 2022

RcppArmadillo 0.11.4.0.1 on CRAN: Updates

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 1023 packages other packages on CRAN, downloaded 26.4 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 497 times according to Google Scholar.

This release reflect as new upstream release 11.4.0 Conrad made recently. It turns out that it triggered warnings under g++-12 for about five packages in the fortify mode default for Debian builds. Conrad then kindly addressed this with a few fixes.

The full set of changes (since the last CRAN release 0.11.2.4.0) follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.11.4.0.1 (2022-10-01

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 11.4.0 (Ship of Theseus)

    • faster handling of compound expressions by sum()

    • extended pow() with various forms of element-wise power operations

    • added find_nan() to find indices of NaN elements

  • Also applied fixes to avoid g++-12 warnings affecting just a handful of CRAN packages.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sun, 11 Sep 2022

RcppArmadillo 0.11.2.4.0 on CRAN: Bugfix and Deprecation

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 1016 packages other packages on CRAN, downloaded 26.2 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 493 times according to Google Scholar.

This new release (made yesterday) brings three changes. First, it updates the release to the upstream 11.2.4 bugfix release made days ago by Conrad. Second, it contains support for the deprecation transition we are managing in issue #391. In short, the (convenient but non-standard) initialization via use of << has been deprecated upstream. Until all packages are updated, we override this in the RcppArmadillo but aim to become ‘compliant’. Out of the over 1000 packages, a mere 25 need small adjustments. I reached out email and PRs, and the response has been great. Eight packages are already updated on CRAN, and several others have already in integrated or merged the change. Lastly, Conrad pointed out that the fastLm() example and application can be written more concisely by using arma::dot().

The full set of changes (since the last CRAN release 0.11.2.3.1) follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.11.2.4.0 (2022-09-09)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 11.2.4 (Classic Roast)

    • fix handling of std::move() involving matrices constructed with auxiliary memory
  • In the fastLm() examples, use arma::dot() to compute to the inner product (as proposed by Conrad), plus small edits

  • Support optional #define named RCPPARMADILLO_FORCE_DEPRECATE to suppress use of ARMA_IGNORE_DEPRECATED_MARKER permitting use and development under deprecation

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sun, 28 Aug 2022

littler 0.3.16 on CRAN: Package Updates

max-heap image

The seventeenth release of littler as a CRAN package just landed, following in the now sixteen year history (!!) as a package started by Jeff in 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later.

littler is the first command-line interface for R as it predates Rscript. It allows for piping as well for shebang scripting via #!, uses command-line arguments more consistently and still starts faster. It also always loaded the methods package which Rscript only started to do in recent years.

littler lives on Linux and Unix, has its difficulties on macOS due to yet-another-braindeadedness there (who ever thought case-insensitive filesystems as a default were a good idea?) and simply does not exist on Windows (yet – the build system could be extended – see RInside for an existence proof, and volunteers are welcome!). See the FAQ vignette on how to add it to your PATH. A few examples are highlighted at the Github repo, as well as in the examples vignette.

This release, the first since last December, further extends install2.r accept multiple repos options thanks to Tatsuya Shima, overhauls and substantially extends installBioc.r thanks to Pieter Moris, and includes a number of (generally smaller) changes I added (see below).

The full change description follows.

Changes in littler version 0.3.16 (2022-08-28)

  • Changes in package

    • The configure code checks for two more headers

    • The RNG seeding matches the current version in R (Dirk)

  • Changes in examples

    • A cowu.r 'check Window UCRT' helper was added (Dirk)

    • A getPandoc.r downloader has been added (Dirk)

    • The -r option tp install2.r has been generalzed (Tatsuya Shima in #95)

    • The rcc.r code / package checker now has valgrind option (Dirk)

    • install2.r now installs to first element in .libPaths() by default (Dirk)

    • A very simple r2u.r help has been added (Dirk)

    • The installBioc.r has been generalized and extended similar to install2.r (Pieter Moris in #103)

My CRANberries service provides a comparison to the previous release. Full details for the littler release are provided as usual at the ChangeLog page, and also on the package docs website. The code is available via the GitHub repo, from tarballs and now of course also from its CRAN page and via install.packages("littler"). Binary packages are available directly in Debian as well as soon via Ubuntu binaries at CRAN thanks to the tireless Michael Rutter.

Comments and suggestions are welcome at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Thu, 25 Aug 2022

RApiSerialize 0.1.2 on CRAN: Small Bugfix

A new bug fix release 0.1.2 of RApiSerialize got onto CRAN earlier. It follows on the 0.1.1 release from earlier this month, and addresses a minor build issue where an error message, only in the case of missing long vector support, tried to use an i18n macro that is not supplied by the build.

The RApiSerialize package is used by both my RcppRedis as well as by Travers excellent qs package. Neither one of us has a need to switch to format 3 yet so format 2 remains the default. But along with other standard updates to package internals, it was straightforward to offer the newer format so that is what we did.

Changes in version 0.1.2 (2022-08-25)

  • Correct an error() call (when missing long vector support) to not use i18n macro

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat to the previous version. More details are at the RApiSerialize page; code, issue tickets etc at the GitHub repository.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rapiserialize | permanent link

Thu, 18 Aug 2022

RcppArmadillo 0.11.2.3.1 on CRAN: Double Update

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 1005 packages other packages on CRAN (as celebrated in this blog post on passing 1000 packages from just four days ago), downloaded nearly 26 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 488 times according to Google Scholar.

This release brings together two distinct changes. First, it updates the relese from upstream 11.2.0 (and CRAN 0.11.2.0.0 released a few weeks ago) to the now current 11.2.3 release by Conrard (given that more than four weeks have passed so that we do not surpass CRAN’s desired cadence of ‘releases no more than once a month’). The changeset includes a few small refinements (see below), it also includedes a deprecation for initialization for which I will need to reach out to a few packages for whom this triggers a deprecation warning. And speaking of deprecation, the other reason for this release is the desire by the Matrix package to phase out a few older conversions (or casts in C/C++ lingo) which we accomodated.

The full set of changes (since the last CRAN release 0.11.2.0.0) follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.11.2.3.1 (2022-08-16)

  • Accomodate upcoming Matrix 1.4-2 deprecation for conversion (Dirk in #387)

  • CRAN release with small upstream changes in Armadillo 11.2.1,2,3 made since the last CRAN release 0.11.2.0.0 (Dirk in #383, #384 and #386)

  • Undefine arma_deprecated warning as it affects a number of CRAN packages which will likely need a small transition

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.11.2.3.0 (2022-07-12) (GitHub Only)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 11.2.3 (Classic Roast)

    • fix Cube::insert_slices() to accept Cube::slice() as input

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.11.2.2.0 (2022-07-04) (GitHub Only)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 11.2.2 (Classic Roast)

    • fix incorrect and/or slow convergence in single-threaded versions of kmeans(), gmm_diag::learn(), gmm_full::learn()

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.11.2.1.0 (2022-06-28) (GitHub Only)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 11.2.1 (Classic Roast)

    • old style matrix initialisation via the << operator will now emit a compile-time deprecation warning

    • use of the old and inactive ARMA_DONT_PRINT_ERRORS option will now emit a compile-time deprecation warning

    • the option ARMA_WARN_LEVEL can be used instead

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sun, 14 Aug 2022

RcppArmadillo used by 1001 CRAN Packages

It is with a mix of pride and joy, but also some genuine astonishment and amazement, that we can share that the counter of reverse dependencies at CRAN for our RcppArmadillo package for R just crossed 1000 packages [1]:

Conrad actually posted this a few weeks ago, by my count we were then still a few packages shy. In any event, having crossed this marker this summer, either then or now, and after more than a dozen years of working on the package is a really nice moment. Google Scholar counts nearly 500 citations for our CSDA paper (also this vignette), and that ratio of nearly a citation for every two packages used is certainly impressive. We have had the pleasure of working with so many other researchers and scientists using RcppArmadillo. Its combination of performance (C++, after all, and heavily tuned) and ease-of-use (inspired by ‘another popular flavour for matrix computing’ that is however mostly interpreted) makes for a powerful package, and we are delighted to see it used so widely.

Working on this with Conrad has been excellent. The (upstream) package (now at this GitLab repo) has received numerous releases at a rate that is in fact so high that we now ‘slow it down’ to not exceed a monthly cadence of uploads to CRAN. But the package should always be in release condition at its GitHub repo, and is frequently also installable in ‘rc’ versions via the Rcpp drat repo.

So with that, a big Thank You! to Conrad, to Romain for all the early work laying the package foundations, and to all the users of (Rcpp)Armadillo for helping us along with testing, suggestions, extensions, and bug reports. Keep’em coming!

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

[1] The code snippet shows that we remove some possible duplicates in the count (mostly for the total of packages). This is a correction we use across packages for consistency. It does not have an effect for RcppArmadillo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Sun, 07 Aug 2022

RApiSerialize 0.1.1 on CRAN: Updates

A new release 0.1.1 of RApiSerialize is now on CRAN. While this is the first release in seven years (!!), it brings mostly minor internal updates along with the option of using serialization format 3.

The package is used by both my RcppRedis as well as by Travers excellent qs package. Neither one of us has a need to switch to format 3 yet so format 2 remains the default. But along with other standard updates to package internals, it was straightforward to offer the newer format so that is what we did.

Changes in version 0.1.1 (2022-08-07)

  • Updated CI use to r-ci

  • Expanded and updated both DESCRIPTION and README.md

  • Updated package internals to register compiled functions

  • Add support for serialization format 3, default remains 2

  • Minor synchronization with upstream

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat to the previous version. More details are at the RApiSerialize page; code, issue tickets etc at the GitHub repository.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rapiserialize | permanent link

Sat, 06 Aug 2022

RcppCCTZ 0.2.11 on CRAN: Updates

A new release 0.2.11 of RcppCCTZ is now on CRAN.

RcppCCTZ uses Rcpp to bring CCTZ to R. CCTZ is a C++ library for translating between absolute and civil times using the rules of a time zone. In fact, it is two libraries. One for dealing with civil time: human-readable dates and times, and one for converting between between absolute and civil times via time zones. And while CCTZ is made by Google(rs), it is not an official Google product. The RcppCCTZ page has a few usage examples and details. This package was the first CRAN package to use CCTZ; by now four others packages include its sources too. Not ideal, but beyond our control.

This version updates the include headers used in the interface API header thanks to a PR by Jing Lu, updates to upstream changes, and switched r-ci CI to r2u.

Changes in version 0.2.11 (2022-08-06)

  • More specific includes in RcppCCTZ_API.h (Jing Lu in #42 closing #41).

  • Synchronized with upstream CCTZ (Dirk in #43).

  • Switched r-ci to r2u use.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat to the previous version. More details are at the RcppCCTZ page; code, issue tickets etc at the GitHub repository.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Fri, 05 Aug 2022

RcppXts 0.0.5 on CRAN: Routine Refreshment

A full eight and half years (!!) since its 0.0.4 release, version 0.0.5 of RcppXts is now on CRAN. The RcppXts package demonstrates how to access the export C API of xts which we contributed a looong time ago.

This release contains an accumulated small set of updates made as the CRAN Policies evolved. We now register and use the shared library routines (updates in both src/init.c and NAMESPACE), turned on continuous integration, switched it from the now disgraces service to another, adopted our portable r-ci along with r2, added badges to the README.md, updated to https URLs, and made sure the methods package (from base R) was actually imported (something Rcpp has a need for at startup). That latter part now triggered a recent email from the CRAN maintainers which prompted this release.

The NEWS entries follow.

Changes in version 0.0.5 (2022-08-05)

  • Depends on xts 0.9-6 now on CRAN

  • Exports (and documents) a number of additional functions

  • Switch CI use to r-ci and r2u

  • README.md, DESCRIPTION and NEWS.Rd were updated and expanded

  • NAMESPACE import of the shared library uses registration

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release. A bit more information about the package is available here as well as at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Wed, 13 Jul 2022

rfoaas 2.3.2: New upstream accessors

rfoaas greed example

FOAAS by now moved to version 2.3.2 in its repo. This releases 2.3.2 of rfoaas catches up, and brings the first release in about two and a half years.

This 2.3.2 release of FOAAS brings us six new REST access points: absolutely(), dense(), dumbledore(), lowpoly(), understand(), and yeah(). Along with these new functions, documentation and tests were updated.

My CRANberries service provides a diff to the previous CRAN release. Questions, comments etc should go to the GitHub issue tracker. More background information is on the project page as well as on the github repo

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rfoaas | permanent link

Sat, 09 Jul 2022

Rcpp 1.0.9 on CRAN: Regular Updates

rcpp logo

The Rcpp team is please to announce the newest release 1.0.9 of Rcpp which hit CRAN late yesterday, and has been uploaded to Debian as well. Windows and macOS builds should appear at CRAN in the next few days, as will builds in different Linux distribution and of course at r2u. The release was prepared om July 2, but it took a few days to clear a handful of spurious errors as false positives with CRAN — this can when the set of reverse dependencies is so large, and the CRAN team remains busy. This release continues with the six-months cycle started with release 1.0.5 in July 2020. (This time, CRAN had asked for an interim release to silence a C++ warning; we then needed a quick follow-up to tweak tests.) As a reminder, interim ‘dev’ or ‘rc’ releases should generally be available in the Rcpp drat repo. These rolling release tend to work just as well, and are also fully tested against all reverse-dependencies.

Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing R with C or C++ code. Right now, around 2559 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further, along with 252 in BioConductor. On CRAN, 13.9% of all packages depend (directly) on CRAN, and 58.5% of all compiled packages do. From the cloud mirror of CRAN (which is but a subset of all CRAN downloads), Rcpp has been downloaded 61.5 million times.

This release is incremental and extends Rcpp with a number of small improvements all detailed in the NEWS file as well as below. We want to highlight the external contributions: a precious list tag is cleared on removal, and a move constructor and assignment for strings has been added (thanks to Dean Scarff), and (thanks to Bill Denney and Marco Colombo) two minor errors are corrected in the vignette documentation. A big Thank You! to everybody who contributed pull request, opened or answered issues, or questions at StackOverflow or on the mailing list.

The full list of details follows.

Changes in Rcpp hotfix release version 1.0.9 (2022-07-02)

  • Changes in Rcpp API:

    • Accomodate C++98 compilation by adjusting attributes.cpp (Dirk in #1193 fixing #1192)

    • Accomodate newest compilers replacing deprecated std::unary_function and std::binary_function with std::function (Dirk in #1202 fixing #1201 and CRAN request)

    • Upon removal from precious list, the tag is set to null (Iñaki in #1205 fixing #1203)

    • Move constructor and assignment for strings have been added (Dean Scarff in #1219).

  • Changes in Rcpp Documentation:

    • Adjust one overflowing column (Bill Denney in #1196 fixing #1195)

    • Correct a typo in the FAQ (Marco Colombo in #1217)

  • Changes in Rcpp Deployment:

    • Accomodate four digit version numbers in unit test (Dirk)

    • Do not run complete test suite to limit test time to CRAN preference (Dirk in #1206)

    • Small updates to the CI test containers have been made

    • Some of changes also applied to an interim release 1.0.8.3 made for CRAN on 2022-03-14.

Thanks to my CRANberries, you can also look at a diff to the previous release. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page. Bugs reports are welcome at the GitHub issue tracker as well (where one can also search among open or closed issues); questions are also welcome under rcpp tag at StackOverflow which also allows searching among the (currently) 2886 previous questions.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sun, 19 Jun 2022

#38: Faster Feedback Systems

Engineers build systems. Good engineers always stress and focus efficiency of these systems.

Two recent examples of engineering thinking follow. One was in a video / podcast interview with Martin Thompson (who is a noted high-performance code expert) I came across recently. The overall focus of the hour-long interview is on ‘managing software complexity’. Around minute twenty-two, the conversation turns to feedback loops and systems, and a strong preference for simple and fast systems for more immediate feedback. An important topic indeed.

The second example connects to this and permeates many tweets and other writings by Erik Bernhardsson. He had an earlier 2017 post on ‘Optimizing for iteration speed’, as well as a 17 May 2022 tweet on minimizing feedback loop size, another 28 Mar 2022 tweet reply on shorter feedback loops, then a 14 Feb 2022 post on problems with slow feedback loops, as well as a 13 Jan 2022 post on a priority for tighter feedback loops, and lastly a 23 Jul 2021 post on fast feedback cycles. You get the idea: Erik really digs faster feedback loops. Nobody likes to wait: immediatecy wins each time.

A few years ago, I had touched on this topic with two posts on how to make (R) package compilation (and hence installation) faster. One idea (which I still use whenever I must compile) was in post #11 on caching compilation. Another idea was in post #13: make it faster by not doing it, in this case via binary installation which skip the need for compilation (and which is what I aim for with, say, CI dependencies). Several subsequent posts can be found by scrolling down the r^4 blog section: we stressed the use of the amazing Rutter PPA ‘c2d4u’ for CRAN binaries (often via Rocker containers, the (post #28) promise of RSPM, and the (post #29) awesomeness of bspm. And then in the more recent post #34 from last December we got back to a topic which ties all these things together: Dependencies. We quoted Mies van der Rohe: Less is more. Especially when it comes to dependencies as these elongate the feedback loop and thereby delay feedback.

Our most recent post #37 on r2u connects these dots. Access to a complete set of CRAN binaries with full-dependency resolution accelerates use and installation. This of course also covers testing and continuous integration. Why wait minutes to recompile the same packages over and over when you can install the full Tidyverse in 18 seconds or the brms package and all it needs in 13 seconds as shown in the two gifs also on the r2u documentation site.

You can even power up the example setup of the second gif via this gitpod link giving you a full Ubuntu 22.04 session in your browser to try this: so go forth and install something from CRAN with ease! The benefit of a system such our r2u CRAN binaries is clear: faster feedback loops. This holds whether you work with few or many dependencies, tiny or tidy. Faster matters, and feedback can be had sooner.

And with the title of this post we now get a rallying cry to advocate for faster feedback systems: “FFS”.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/r4 | permanent link

Wed, 15 Jun 2022

RcppArmadillo 0.11.2.0.0 on CRAN: New Upstream

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 991 other packages on CRAN, downloaded over 25 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 476 times according to Google Scholar.

This release brings a second upstream fix by Conrad in the release series 11.*. We once again tested this very rigorously via a complete reverse-depedency check (for which results are always logged here). It so happens that CRAN then had a spurious error when re-checking on upload, and it took a fews days to square this as everybody remains busy – but the release prepared on June 10 is now on CRAN.

The full set of changes (since the last CRAN release 0.11.1.1.0) follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.11.2.0.0 (2022-06-10)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 11.2 (Classic Roast)

    • faster handling of sparse submatrix column views by norm(), accu(), nonzeros()

    • extended randu() and randn() to allow specification of distribution parameters

    • internal refactoring, leading to faster compilation times

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

AsioHeaders 1.22.1-1 on CRAN

An updated version of the AsioHeaders package arrived at CRAN yesterday (in one of those pleasant fully-automated uploads and transitions). Asio provides a cross-platform C++ library for network and low-level I/O programming. It is also included in Boost – but requires linking when used as part of Boost. This standalone version of Asio is a header-only C++ library which can be used without linking (just like our BH package with parts of Boost).

This release brings a new upstream version, following a two-year period without updated. This was tickled by OpenSSL 3.0 header changes as seen in a package using both AsioHeaders and OpenSSL.

Changes in version 1.22.1-1 (2022-06-14)

  • Upgraded to Asio 1.22.1 (Dirk in #7 fixing #6).

Thanks to my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report relative to the previous release.

Comments and suggestions about AsioHeaders are welcome via the issue tracker at the GitHub GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/asioheaders | permanent link

Wed, 25 May 2022

RcppAPT 0.0.9: Minor Update

A new version of the RcppAPT package with the R interface to the C++ library behind the awesome apt, apt-get, apt-cache, … commands and their cache powering Debian, Ubuntu and the like arrived on CRAN earlier today.

RcppAPT allows you to query the (Debian or Ubuntu) package dependency graph at will, with build-dependencies (if you have deb-src entries), reverse dependencies, and all other goodies. See the vignette and examples for illustrations.

This release updates the code to the Apt 2.5.0 release this makes. It makes a cleaner distinction between public and private components of the API. We adjusted one access point to a pattern we already used, and while at it, simplified some of the transition from the pre-Apt 2.0.0 interface. No new features. The NEWS entries follow.

Changes in version 0.0.9 (2022-05-25)

  • Simplified and standardized to only use public API

  • No longer tests and accomodates pre-Apt 2.0 API

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release. A bit more information about the package is available here as well as at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sat, 21 May 2022

#37: Introducing r2u with 2 x 19k CRAN binaries for Ubuntu 22.04 and 20.04

One month ago I started work on a new side project which is now up and running, and deserving on an introductory blog post: r2u. It was announced in two earlier tweets (first, second) which contained the two (wicked) demos below also found at the documentation site.

So what is this about? It brings full and complete CRAN installability to Ubuntu LTS, both the ‘focal’ release 20.04 and the recent ‘jammy’ release 22.04. It is unique in resolving all R and CRAN packages with the system package manager. So whenever you install something it is guaranteed to run as its dependencies are resolved and co-installed as needed. Equally important, no shared library will be updated or removed by the system as the possible dependency of the R package is known and declared. No other package management system for R does that as only apt on Debian or Ubuntu can — and this project integrates all CRAN packages (plus 200+ BioConductor packages). It will work with any Ubuntu installation on laptop, desktop, server, cloud, container, or in WSL2 (but is limited to Intel/AMD chips, sorry Raspberry Pi or M1 laptop). It covers all of CRAN (or nearly 19k packages), all the BioConductor packages depended-upon (currently over 200), and only excludes less than a handful of CRAN packages that cannot be built.

Usage

Setup instructions approaches described concisely in the repo README.md and documentation site. It consists of just five (or fewer) simple steps, and scripts are provided too for ‘focal’ (20.04) and ‘jammy’ (22.04).

Demos

Check out these two demos (also at the r2u site):

Installing the full tidyverse in one command and 18 seconds

Installing brms and its depends in one command and 13 seconds (and show gitpod.io)

Integration via bspm

The r2u setup can be used directly with apt (or dpkg or any other frontend to the package management system). Once installed apt update; apt upgrade will take care of new packages. For this to work, all CRAN packages (and all BioConductor packages depended upon) are mapped to names like r-cran-rcpp and r-bioc-s4vectors: an r prefix, the repo, and the package name, all lower-cased. That works—but thanks to the wonderful bspm package by Iñaki Úcar we can do much better. It connects R’s own install.packages() and update.packages() to apt. So we can just say (as the demos above show) install.packages("tidyverse") or install.packages("brms") and binaries are installed via apt which is fantastic and it connects R to the system package manager. The setup is really only two lines and described at the r2u site as part of the setup.

History and Motivation

Turning CRAN packages into .deb binaries is not a new idea. Albrecht Gebhardt was the first to realize this about twenty years ago (!!) and implemented it with a single Perl script. Next, Albrecht, Stefan Moeller, David Vernazobres and I built on top of this which is described in this useR! 2007 paper. A most excellent generalization and rewrite was provided by Charles Blundell in an superb Google Summer of Code contribution in 2008 which I mentored. Charles and I described it in this talk at useR! 2009. I ran that setup for a while afterwards, but it died via an internal database corruption in 2010 right when I tried to demo it at CRAN headquarters in Vienna. This peaked at, if memory serves, about 5k packages: all of CRAN at the time. Don Armstrong took it one step further in a full reimplemenation which, if I recall correctly, coverd all of CRAN and BioConductor for what may have been 8k or 9k packages. Don had a stronger system (with full RAID-5) but it also died in a crash and was never rebuilt even though he and I could have relied on Debian resources (as all these approaches focused on Debian). During that time, Michael Rutter created a variant that cleverly used an Ubuntu-only setup utilizing Launchpad. This repo is still going strong, used and relied-upon by many, and about 5k packages (per distribution) strong. At one point, a group consisting of Don, Michael, Gábor Csárdi and myself (as lead/PI) had financial support from the RConsortium ISC for a more general re-implementation , but that support was withdrawn when we did not have time to deliver.

We should also note other long-standing approaches. Detlef Steuer has been using the openSUSE Build Service to provide nearly all of CRAN for openSUSE for many years. Iñaki Úcar built a similar system for Fedora described in this blog post. Iñaki and I also have a arXiv paper describing all this.

Details

Please see the the r2u site for all details on using r2u.

Acknowledgements

The help of everybody who has worked on this is greatly appreciated. So a huge Thank you! to Albrecht, David, Stefan, Charles, Don, Michael, Detlef, Gábor, Iñaki—and whoever I may have omitted. Similarly, thanks to everybody working on R, CRAN, Debian, or Ubuntu—it all makes for a superb system. And another big Thank you! goes to my GitHub sponsors whose continued support is greatly appreciated.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/r4 | permanent link

Sun, 15 May 2022

RcppArmadillo 0.11.1.1.0 on CRAN: Updates

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has syntax deliberately close to Matlab and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 978 other packages on CRAN, downloaded over 24 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 469 times according to Google Scholar.

This release brings a first new upstream fix in the new release series 11.*. In particular, treatment of ill-conditioned matrices is further strengthened. We once again tested this very rigorously via three different RC releases each of which got a full reverse-dependencies run (for which results are always logged here). A minor issue with old g++ compilers was found once 11.1.0 was tagged to this upstream release is now 11.1.1. Also fixed is an OpenMP setup issue where Justin Silverman noticed that we did not propagate the -fopenmp setting correctly.

The full set of changes (since the last CRAN release 0.11.0.0.0) follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.11.1.1.0 (2022-05-15)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 11.1.1 (Angry Kitchen Appliance)

    • added inv_opts::no_ugly option to inv() and inv_sympd() to disallow inverses of poorly conditioned matrices

    • more efficient handling of rank-deficient matrices via inv_opts::allow_approx option in inv() and inv_sympd()

    • better detection of rank deficient matrices by solve()

    • faster handling of symmetric and diagonal matrices by cond()

  • The configure script again propagates the'found' case again, thanks to Justin Silverman for the heads-up and suggested fix (Dirk and Justin in #376 and #377 fixing #375).

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.11.0.1.0 (2022-04-14)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 11.0.1 (Creme Brulee)

    • fix miscompilation of inv() and inv_sympd() functions when using inv_opts::allow_approx and inv_opts::tiny options

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Fri, 06 May 2022

RProtoBuf 0.4.19 on CRAN: Updates

A new release 0.4.19 of RProtoBuf arrived on CRAN earlier today. RProtoBuf provides R with bindings for the Google Protocol Buffers (“ProtoBuf”) data encoding and serialization library used and released by Google, and deployed very widely in numerous projects as a language and operating-system agnostic protocol.

This release contains a pull request contribution by Michael Chirico to add support for the TextFormat API, a minor maintenance fix ensuring (standard) string are referenced as std::string to avoid a hickup on Arch builds, some repo updates, plus reporting of (package and library) versions on startup. The following section from the NEWS.Rd file has more details.

Changes in RProtoBuf version 0.4.19 (2022-05-06)

  • Small cleanups to repository

  • Raise minimum Protocol Buffers version to 3.3 (closes #83)

  • Update package version display, added to startup message

  • Expose TextFormat API (Michael Chirico in #88 closing #87)

  • Add missing explicit std:: on seven string instances in one file (closes #89)

Thanks to my CRANberries, there is a diff to the previous release. The RProtoBuf page has copies of the (older) package vignette, the ‘quick’ overview vignette, and the pre-print of our JSS paper. Questions, comments etc should go to the GitHub issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rprotobuf | permanent link

Thu, 05 May 2022

RQuantLib 0.4.16 on CRAN: Small Updates

A new release 0.4.16 of RQuantLib arrived at CRAN earlier today, and has been uploaded to Debian as well.

QuantLib is a very comprehensice free/open-source library for quantitative finance; RQuantLib connects it to the R environment and language.

The release of RQuantLib comes agaain about four months after the previous release, and brings a a few small updates for daycounters, all thanks to Kai Lin, plus a small parameter change to avoid an error in an example, and small updates to the Docker files.

Changes in RQuantLib version 0.4.16 (2022-05-05)

  • Documentationn for daycounters was updated and extended (Kai Lin)

  • Deprecated daycounters were approtiately updated (Kai Lin)

  • One example parameterization was changed to avoid error (Dirk)

  • The Docker files were updated

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the this release. As always, more detailed information is on the RQuantLib page. Questions, comments etc should go to the new rquantlib-devel mailing list. Issue tickets can be filed at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rquantlib | permanent link

Wed, 13 Apr 2022

drat 0.2.3 on CRAN: Arm M1 Support

drat user

A new minor release of drat arrived on CRAN today. drat stands for drat R Archive Template, and helps with easy-to-create and easy-to-use repositories for R packages. Since its inception in early 2015 it has found widespread adoption among R users because repositories with marked releases is the better way to distribute code. See below for a few custom reference examples.

Because for once it really is as your mother told you: Friends don’t let friends install random git commit snapshots. Properly rolled-up releases it is. Just how CRAN shows us: a model that has demonstrated for two-plus decades how to do this. And you can too: drat is easy to use, documented by six vignettes and just works. Detailed information about drat is at its documentation site.

This release adds support for the macOS Arm M1 architecture, initially supplied in a PR last fall and now finalized with additional tests. The NEWS file summarises the release as follows:

Changes in drat version 0.2.3 (2022-04-13)

  • Arm M1 repos are now supported (#126 and #131 fixing #125)

  • A vignette typo has been fixed (#130)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. More detailed information is on the drat page as well as at the documentation site.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/drat | permanent link

Sun, 10 Apr 2022

RcppRedis 0.2.1: Maintenance

A month after the major release 0.2.0 bringing pub/sub and other goodies to our RcppRedis package, a new version 0.2.1 arrived on CRAN yesterday. RcppRedis is one of several packages connecting R to the fabulous Redis in-memory datastructure store (and much more). RcppRedis does not pretend to be feature complete, but it may do some things faster than the other interfaces, and also offers an optional coupling with MessagePack binary (de)serialization via RcppMsgPack. The package has carried production loads for several years now.

This release updated the rredis suggestion by adding an Additional_repositories entry as Bryan decided to retire the rredis package. You can still install it via install.packages("rredis") by setting the addtional repo, for example repos=c("https://ghrr.github.io/drat", getOption("repos")) as documented in package and at our ghrr drat repo.

The detailed changes list follows.

Changes in version 0.2.1 (2022-04-09)

  • The rredis package can be installed via the repo listed in Additional_repositories; the pubsub.R test file makes rredis optional and conditional; all demos now note that the optional rredis package is installable via the drat listed in Additional_repositories.

  • The fallback-compilation of hiredis has been forced to override compilation flags because CRAN knows better than upstream.

  • The GLOBEX pub/sub example has small updates.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release. More information is on the RcppRedis page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Fri, 08 Apr 2022

RcppEigen 0.3.3.9.2 on CRAN: Maintenance

A new release 0.3.3.9.2 of RcppEigen arrived on CRAN today (and already went to Debian). Eigen is a C++ template library for linear algebra: matrices, vectors, numerical solvers, and related algorithms.

This update was (as it happens) requested by CRAN as R aims to bring the Fortran / C interface to best practices. We call dgesdd twice in one example and use a character argument, and the-powers-that-be now prefer better control over that character argument. So we did. Another change, kindly contributed by Mikael Jagan, switches row and column indices for R_xlen_t allowing for greater range. Plus some more small tweaks mostly to CI, see the NEWS entry below for full details.

And again as we said for the previous three releases:

One additional and recent change was the accomodation of a recent CRAN Policy change to not allow gcc or clang to mess with diagnostic messages. A word of caution: this may make your compilation of packages using RcppEigen very noisy so consider adding -Wno-ignored-attributes to the compiler flags added in your ~/.R/Makevars.

We still find this requirement rather annoying. Eigen is only usable if you set, say,

-Wno-deprecated-declarations -Wno-parentheses -Wno-ignored-attributes -Wno-unused-function

asoptions in~/.R/Makevars`. But CRAN makes the rules. Maybe if a few of us gently and politely nudge them they may relent one day. One can only hope.

The complete NEWS file entry follows.

Changes in RcppEigen version 0.3.3.9.2 (2022-04-05)

  • Added test coverage in continuous integration

  • Added new tests to increase test coverage

  • Small improvement to the RcppEigen.package.skeleton() code

  • Small updates and edits to README.md and inst/CITATION

  • Use R_xlen_t for vector rows and columns (by Mikael Jagan)

  • Support USE_FC_LEN_T by adding FCONE to two dgesdd calls

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the most recent release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Mon, 04 Apr 2022

RcppSpdlog 0.0.8 on CRAN: Upstream Update

A new version 0.0.8 of RcppSpdlog is now on CRAN. RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovich.

This release brings a new upstream release 1.10.0 of spdlog. The (minimal) NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in RcppSpdlog version 0.0.8 (2022-04-04)

  • Upgraded to upstream releases spdlog 1.10.0

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report. More detailed information is on the RcppSpdlog page, or the package documention site.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

RcppArmadillo 0.11.0.0.0 on CRAN: Upstream Updates

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 972 other packages on CRAN, downloaded over 24 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 465 times according to Google Scholar.

This release brings a new upstream release 11.0.0. We tested this very rigorously via three different RC release each of which got a full reverse-dependencies run (for which results are always logged here).

The full set of changes (since the last CRAN release 0.10.8.1.0) follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.11.0.0 (2022-04-04)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 11.0.0 (Creme Brulee)

    • added variants of inv() and inv_sympd() that provide rcond (reciprocal condition number)

    • expanded inv() and inv_sympd() with options inv_opts::tiny and inv_opts::allow_approx

    • stricter handling of singular matrices by inv() and inv_sympd()

    • stricter handling of non-sympd matrices by inv() and inv_sympd()

    • stricter handling of non-finitie matrices by pinv()

    • more robust handling of rank deficient matrices by solve()

    • faster handling of diagonal matrices by rcond()

    • changed eigs_sym() and eigs_gen() to use higher quality RNG

    • quantile() and median() will now throw an exception if given matrices/vectors have NaN elements

    • workaround for yet another bug in Intel MKL

  • Until May 2022, protect correction to Field behavior via define of RCPP_ARMADILLO_FIX_Field

  • If a LAPACK installation with missing complex routines is found (as e.g. Ubuntu using 3.9.0) then the LAPACK unit test is skipped.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.8.2.0 (2022-02-01)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 10.8.2 (Realm Raider)

    • fix potential speed regression in pinv() and rank()

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Fri, 01 Apr 2022

RInside 0.2.17

A new release 0.2.17 of RInside arrived on CRAN and in Debian today. This is the first release in two years since the 0.2.16 release. RInside provides a set of convenience classes which facilitate embedding of R inside of C++ applications and programs, using the classes and functions provided by Rcpp.

This release brings a minor update for R 4.2.0, due out later this month, and kindly provided by Tomas Kalibera. It updates one function declaration; we wrapped some conditioning around so that RInside continues to build with older releases too. Besides that minor updates were made to continuous integration and some of the package files.

The short list of changes since the last release were:

Changes in RInside version 0.2.17 (2022-03-31)

  • A Windows-only patch for R 4.2.0 kindly provided by Tomas Kalibera was applied, and also conditioned on R (>= 4.2.0)

  • Continuous Integration setup was updated and now uses r-ci.

  • Several updates were made to README.md (badges etc) and DESCRIPTION

My CRANberries also provides a short report with changes from the previous release. More information is on the RInside page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the Rcpp R-Forge page, or to issues tickets at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rinside | permanent link

Tue, 29 Mar 2022

RcppBDT 0.2.5: Maintenance

A minor maintenance release for the RcppBDT package is now on CRAN.

The RcppBDT package is an early adopter of Rcpp and was one of the first packages utilizing Boost and its Date_Time library. The now more widely-used package anytime is a direct descentant of RcppBDT. Thanks again for the heads-up!

This release mostly deals with a one-definition rule violation detected by link-time optimisation (which can be enable when configuring R itself at build time with --enable-lto). I confused myself into thinking Rcpp Modules may be at fault, but Iñaki was a little more awake than myself and noticed that I only needed to carry the (common) header RcppBDT.h to the file toPOSIXct.cpp added last summer.

The NEWS entry follows:

Changes in version 0.2.5 (2022-03-29)

  • Ensure consistent compilation by ensuring RcppBDT.h is included in all files, this addresses an LTO/ODR issue

  • Correct one declaration in init.c

  • Minor additional cleanups

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Mon, 28 Mar 2022

RcppCNPy 0.2.11

A minor maintenance release of the RcppCNPy package arrived on CRAN three days ago, but we skipped announcing it right then.

RcppCNPy provides R with read and write access to NumPy files thanks to the cnpy library by Carl Rogers along with Rcpp for the glue to R.

One of the vignettes created an issue at CRAN with one of the Python modules used, so we simply switched to pre-made vignettes just as we do for a few other packages. Other small changes that had accumulated since the previous release were a new section in the reticulate vignette as well as some more documentation on types as well as some updates to continuous integration and bdages.

Changes in version 0.2.11 (2022-03-24)

  • The reticulate vignette has new section on 3d-arrays.

  • Added clarification to the manual page that the default types are 32-bit integer and 64-bit double (as we are working with R here).

  • Several updates have been made to the CI system; it now runs r-ci.

  • The README.md was updated with some new badges.

  • The vignettes are now pre-made to avoid any external dependencies.

CRANberries also provides a diffstat report for the latest release. As always, feedback is welcome and the best place to start a discussion may be the GitHub issue tickets page.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Thu, 17 Mar 2022

Rcpp 1.0.8.3: Hotfixing Hotfix

rcpp logo

An even newer hot-fix release 1.0.8.3 of Rcpp follows the 1.0.8.2 release of a few days ago and got to CRAN this morning. A Debian upload will follow shortly, and Windows and macOS binaries will appear at CRAN in the next few days. This release again breaks with the six-months cycle started with release 1.0.5 in July 2020. When we addressed the CRAN request in 1.0.8.2 we forgot to dial testing down to their desired level (as ‘three-part’ release numbers do automagically for us, whereas ‘four-part’ do not). This is now taken care of, along with the hot-fix that was in 1.0.8.2 already.

Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing R with C or C++ code. Right now, around 2522 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further, along with 239 in BioConductor.

The full list of details for these two interim releases (and hence all changes accumulated since the last regular release, 1.0.8 in January) follows.

Changes in Rcpp hotfix release version 1.0.8.3 (2022-03-14)

  • Changes in Rcpp API:

    • Accomodate C++98 compilation by adjusting attributes.cpp (Dirk in #1193 fixing #1192)

    • Accomodate newest compilers replacing deprecated std::unary_function and std::binary_function with std::function (Dirk in #1202 fixing #1201 and CRAN request)

  • Changes in Rcpp Documentation:

    • Adjust one overflowing column (Bill Denney in #1196 fixing #1195)
  • Changes in Rcpp Deployment:

    • Accomodate four digit version numbers in unit test (Dirk)

    • Do not run complete test suite to limit test time to CRAN preference (Dirk)

Thanks to my CRANberries, you can also look at a diff to the previous release. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page. Bugs reports are welcome at the GitHub issue tracker as well (where one can also search among open or closed issues); questions are also welcome under rcpp tag at StackOverflow which also allows searching among the (currently) 2843 previous questions.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sat, 12 Mar 2022

RcppGSL 0.3.11: Small Maintenance

A new release 0.3.11 of RcppGSL is now on CRAN. The RcppGSL package provides an interface from R to the GNU GSL by relying on the Rcpp package.

This release updates src/Makefile.ucrt to use the RTools42 libraries. Details follow from the NEWS file.

Changes in version 0.3.11 (2022-03-12)

  • The UCRT Makefile was updated

  • Minor edits to README.md were made

Courtesy of CRANberries, a summary of changes in the most recent release is also available.

More information is on the RcppGSL page. Questions, comments etc should go to the issue tickets at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Fri, 11 Mar 2022

Rcpp 1.0.8.2: Hotfix release per CRAN request

rcpp logo

A new hot-fix release 1.0.8.2 of Rcpp just got to CRAN. It will also be uploaded to Debian shortly, and Windows and macOS binaries will appear at CRAN in the next few days. This release breaks with the six-months cycle started with release 1.0.5 in July 2020 as CRAN desired an update to silence nags from the newest clang version which turned a little loud over a feature deprecated in C++11 (namely std::unary_function() and std::binary_function()). This was easy to replace with std::function() which we did. The release also contains a minor bugfix relative to 1.0.8 and C++98 builds, and minor correction to one pdf vignette. The release was fully tested by us and CRAN as usual against all reverse dependencies.

Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing R with C or C++ code. Right now, around 2519 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further, along with 239 in BioConductor.

The full list of details for this interim release follows.

Changes in Rcpp hotfix release version 1.0.8.2 (2022-03-10)

  • Changes in Rcpp API:

    • Accomodate C++98 compilation by adjusting attributes.cpp (Dirk in #1193 fixing #1192)

    • Accomodate newest compilers replacing deprecated std::unary_function and std::binary_function with std::function (Dirk in #1202 fixing #1201 and CRAN request)

  • Changes in Rcpp Documentation:

    • Adjust one overflowing column (Bill Denney in #1196 fixing #1195)
  • Changes in Rcpp Deployment:

    • Accomodate four digit version numbers in unit test (Dirk)

Thanks to my CRANberries, you can also look at a diff to the previous release. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page. Bugs reports are welcome at the GitHub issue tracker as well (where one can also search among open or closed issues); questions are also welcome under rcpp tag at StackOverflow which also allows searching among the (currently) 2843 previous questions.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Thu, 10 Mar 2022

dtts 0.1.0 on CRAN: New Package

Leonardo and I are thrilled to announce the first CRAN release of dtts. The dtts package builds on top of both our nanotime package and the well-loved and widely-used data.table package by Matt, Arun, Jan, and numerous collaborators.

In a very rough nutshell, you can think of dtts as combining both these potent ingredients to produce something not-entirely-unlike the venerable xts package by our friends Jeff and Josh—but using highest-precision nanosecond increments rather than not-quite-microseconds or dates.

The package is still somewhat rare and bare: it is mostly “just” alignment operators. But because of the power and genius of data.table not all that much more is needed because data.table gets us fifteen years of highly refined, tuned and tested code for data slicing, dicing, and aggregation. To which we now humbly add nanosecond-resolution indexing and alignment.

The package had been simmering for some time, and does of course take advantage of (a lot of) earlier work by Leonardo on his ztsdb project. We look forward to user feedback and suggestions at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/dtts | permanent link

Tue, 08 Mar 2022

RcppRedis 0.2.0: Major Updates

A new major release of RcppRedis arrived on CRAN today. RcppRedis is one of several packages connecting R to the fabulous Redis in-memory datastructure store (and much more). RcppRedis does not pretend to be feature complete, but it may do some things faster than the other interfaces, and also offers an optional coupling with MessagePack binary (de)serialization via RcppMsgPack. The package has carried production loads for several years now.

This release integrates support for pub/sub, a popular messaging pattern in which one or more clients can subscribe to one or more ‘channels’. Whenever a client instances publishes, the Redis server immediately updates all clients listening on the given channel. This pattern is fairly common to transmit data to listeners. A there is a bit more to explain about this, I also added a brand-new vignette describing pub/sub with RcppRedis, along with another introductory vignette about Redis itself. We blogged about this exciting new feature and its particular use for market monitoring in R4 #36 recently too.

The pub/sub feature was available in package rredis by Bryan Lewis and has now been ported over by Bryan in a truly elegant yet compact implementation. We placed the code for the pub/sub examples, both for a single symbol (SP 500) as well as for a set of (futures) symbols, into a new examples/ subdirectory.

Other changes in this release are the removal of the build-dependency on Boost (or, rather, my BH package), an update to the included hiredis library (used if no system-wide version is found), and an updated to the UCRT build for R. That last one is a bit of a sore spot and nobody at CRAN deemed it necessary to tell me they were waiting for me to make this change; communication with the CRAN team can still be “challenging” (and I am being generous here). Anyway, the package is now on CRAN so all is well now, at long last.

The detailed changes list follows.

Changes in version 0.2.0 (2022-03-08)

  • Two simple C++11 features remove needs for BH and lexical_cast() (Dirk in #45 addressing #44).

  • Redis pub/sub is now supported (Dirk in #43, Bryan in #46).

  • Bryan Lewis is now a coauthor.

  • Added pub/sub examples for single and multiple Globex symbols.

  • The included hiredis sources have been updated to release 1.0.2.

  • Two vignettes have been added to introduce Redis and to described a live market-monitoring application included in directory pubsub/.

  • The UCRT build was updated per a suggestion by Tomas.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release. More information is on the RcppRedis page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sun, 06 Mar 2022

nanotime 0.3.6 on CRAN: Updates

Leonardo and I are pleased to another update to our nanotime package bringing it to version 0.3.6 which landed on CRAN earlier today.

nanotime relies on the RcppCCTZ package (as well as the RcppDate package for additional C++ operations) and offers efficient high(er) resolution time parsing and formatting up to nanosecond resolution, and the bit64 package for the actual integer64 arithmetic. Initially implemented using the S3 system, it has benefitted greatly from a rigorous refactoring by Leonardo who not only rejigged nanotime internals in S4 but also added new S4 types for periods, intervals and durations.

This release corrects subsetting with %in% operator, integrates it better fit in the mixed S3/S4 setup, fixes a negative period parse, and updates class comparisons to rely on inherits(). The NEWS snippet has the full more details.

Changes in version 0.3.6 (2022-03-06)

  • Fix incorrect subsetting with operator %in% (Leonardo in #100 fixing #99).

  • Fix incorrect parsing for negative nanoperiod (Leonardo in #100 fixing #96).

  • Test for class via inherits() (Dirk).

Thanks to my CRANberries there is also a diff to the previous version. More details and examples are at the nanotime page; code, issue tickets etc at the GitHub repository – and all documentation is provided at the nanotime documentation site.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/nanotime | permanent link