Fri, 05 Apr 2024

RcppArmadillo 0.12.8.2.0 on CRAN: Upstream Fix

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 1136 other packages on CRAN, downloaded 33.5 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 578 times according to Google Scholar.

This release brings a new upstream bugfix release Armadillo 12.8.2 prepared by Conrad two days ago. It took the usual day to noodle over 1100+ reverse dependencies and ensure two failures were independent of the upgrade (i.e., “no change to worse” in CRAN parlance). It took CRAN another because we hit a random network outage for (spurious) NOTE on a remote URL, and were then caught in the shrapnel from another large package ecosystem update spuriously pointing some build failures that were due to a missing rebuild to us. All good, as human intervention comes to the rescue.

The set of changes since the last CRAN release follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.12.8.2.0 (2024-04-02)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 12.8.2 (Cortisol Injector)

    • Workaround for FFTW3 header clash

    • Workaround in testing framework for issue under macOS

    • Minor cleanups to reduce code bloat

    • Improved documentation

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the Rcpp R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 02 Apr 2024

ulid 0.3.1 on CRAN: New Maintainer, Some Polish

Happy to share that ulid is now (back) on CRAN. It provides universally unique identifiers that are lexicographically sortable, which improves over the more well-known uuid generators.

ulid is a neat little package put together by Bob Rudis a few years ago. It had recently drifted off CRAN so I offered to brush it up and re-submit it. And as tooted earlier today, it took just over an hour to finish that (after the lead up work I had done, including prior email with CRAN in the loop, the repo transfer from Bob’s to my ulid repo plus of course a wee bit of actual maintenance; see below for more).

The NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.3.1 (2024-04-02)

  • New Maintainer

  • Deleted several repository files no longer used or needed

  • Added .editorconfig, ChangeLog and cleanup

  • Converted NEWS.md to NEWS.Rd

  • Simplified R/ directory to one source file

  • Simplified src/ removing redundant Makevars

  • Added ulid() alias

  • Updated / edited roxygen and README.md documention

  • Removed vignette which was identical to README.md

  • Switched continuous integration to GitHub Actions

  • Placed upstream (header-only) library into src/ulid/

  • Renamed single interface file to src/wrapper

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/ulid | permanent link

Sat, 23 Mar 2024

littler 0.3.20 on CRAN: Moar Features!

max-heap image

The twentyfirst release of littler as a CRAN package landed on CRAN just now, following in the now eighteen year history (!!) as a package started by Jeff in 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later.

littler is the first command-line interface for R as it predates Rscript. It allows for piping as well for shebang scripting via #!, uses command-line arguments more consistently and still starts faster. It also always loaded the methods package which Rscript only began to do in recent years.

littler lives on Linux and Unix, has its difficulties on macOS due to yet-another-braindeadedness there (who ever thought case-insensitive filesystems as a default were a good idea?) and simply does not exist on Windows (yet – the build system could be extended – see RInside for an existence proof, and volunteers are welcome!). See the FAQ vignette on how to add it to your PATH. A few examples are highlighted at the Github repo:, as well as in the examples vignette.

This release contains another fair number of small changes and improvements to some of the scripts I use daily to build or test packages, adds a new front-end ciw.r for the recently-released ciw package offering a ‘CRAN Incoming Watcher’, a new helper installDeps2.r (extending installDeps.r), a new doi-to-bib converter, allows a different temporary directory setup I find helpful, deals with one corner deployment use, and more.

The full change description follows.

Changes in littler version 0.3.20 (2024-03-23)

  • Changes in examples scripts

    • New (dependency-free) helper installDeps2.r to install dependencies

    • Scripts rcc.r, tt.r, tttf.r, tttlr.r use env argument -S to set -t to r

    • tt.r can now fill in inst/tinytest if it is present

    • New script ciw.r wrapping new package ciw

    • tttf.t can now use devtools and its loadall

    • New script doi2bib.r to call the DOI converter REST service (following a skeet by Richard McElreath)

  • Changes in package

    • The CI setup uses checkout@v4 and the r-ci-setup action

    • The Suggests: is a little tighter as we do not list all packages optionally used in the the examples (as R does not check for it either)

    • The package load messag can account for the rare build of R under different architecture (Berwin Turlach in #117 closing #116)

    • In non-vanilla mode, the temporary directory initialization in re-run allowing for a non-standard temp dir via config settings

My CRANberries service provides a comparison to the previous release. Full details for the littler release are provided as usual at the ChangeLog page, and also on the package docs website. The code is available via the GitHub repo, from tarballs and now of course also from its CRAN page and via install.packages("littler"). Binary packages are available directly in Debian as well as (in a day or two) Ubuntu binaries at CRAN thanks to the tireless Michael Rutter.

Comments and suggestions are welcome at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/littler | permanent link

Wed, 20 Mar 2024

ciw 0.0.2 on CRAN: Updates

A first revision of the still only one-week old (at CRAN) package ciw has been released to CRAN! It provides is a single (efficient) function incoming() (now along with an alias ciw()) which summarises the state of the incoming directories at CRAN. I happen to like having these things at my (shell) fingertips, so it goes along with (still draft) wrapper ciw.r that will be part of the next littler release.

For example, when I do this right now as I type this, I see (typically less than one second later)

edd@rob:~$ ciw.r 
    Folder                     Name                Time   Size         Age
    <char>                   <char>              <POSc> <char>  <difftime>
1: pretest instantiate_0.2.2.tar.gz 2024-03-20 13:29:00    17K  0.07 hours
2: recheck   tinytable_0.2.0.tar.gz 2024-03-20 12:50:00   565K  0.72 hours
3: pending      Matrix_1.7-0.tar.gz 2024-03-20 12:05:00   2.3M  1.47 hours
4: recheck      survey_4.4-2.tar.gz 2024-03-20 02:02:00   2.2M 11.52 hours
5: waiting   equateIRT_2.4.0.tar.gz 2024-03-19 17:00:00   895K 20.55 hours
6: pending   ravetools_0.1.5.tar.gz 2024-03-19 12:06:00   1.0M 25.45 hours
7: waiting     glmmTMB_1.1.9.tar.gz 2024-03-18 16:04:00   4.2M 45.48 hours
edd@rob:~$ 

See ciw.r --help or ciw.r --usage for more. Alternatively, in your R session, you can call ciw::incoming() (or now ciw::ciw()) for the same result (and/or load the package first).

This release adds some packaging touches, brings the new alias ciw() as well as a state variable with all (known) folder names and some internal improvements for dealing with error conditions. The NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.0.2 (2024-03-20)

  • The package README and DESCRIPTION have been expanded

  • An alias ciw can now be used for incoming

  • Network error handling is now more robist

  • A state variable known_folders lists all CRAN folders below incoming

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/ciw | permanent link

Wed, 13 Mar 2024

ciw 0.0.1 on CRAN: New Package!

Happy to share that ciw is now on CRAN! I had tooted a little bit about it, e.g., here. What it provides is a single (efficient) function incoming() which summarises the state of the incoming directories at CRAN. I happen to like having these things at my (shell) fingertips, so it goes along with (still draft) wrapper ciw.r that will be part of the next littler release.

For example, when I do this right now as I type this, I see

edd@rob:~$ ciw.r
    Folder                   Name                Time   Size          Age
    <char>                 <char>              <POSc> <char>   <difftime>
1: waiting   maximin_1.0-5.tar.gz 2024-03-13 22:22:00    20K   2.48 hours
2: inspect    GofCens_0.97.tar.gz 2024-03-13 21:12:00    29K   3.65 hours
3: inspect verbalisr_0.5.2.tar.gz 2024-03-13 20:09:00    79K   4.70 hours
4: waiting    rnames_1.0.1.tar.gz 2024-03-12 15:04:00   2.7K  33.78 hours
5: waiting  PCMBase_1.2.14.tar.gz 2024-03-10 12:32:00   406K  84.32 hours
6: pending        MPCR_1.1.tar.gz 2024-02-22 11:07:00   903K 493.73 hours
edd@rob:~$ 

which is rather compact as CRAN kept busy! This call runs in about (or just over) one second, which includes launching r. Good enough for me. From a well-connected EC2 instance it is about 800ms on the command-line. When I do I from here inside an R session it is maybe 700ms. And doing it over in Europe is faster still. (I am using ping=FALSE for these to omit the default sanity check of ‘can I haz networking?’ to speed things up. The check adds another 200ms or so.)

The function (and the wrapper) offer a ton of options too this is ridiculously easy to do thanks to the docopt package:

edd@rob:~$ ciw.r -x
Usage: ciw.r [-h] [-x] [-a] [-m] [-i] [-t] [-p] [-w] [-r] [-s] [-n] [-u] [-l rows] [-z] [ARG...]

-m --mega           use 'mega' mode of all folders (see --usage)
-i --inspect        visit 'inspect' folder
-t --pretest        visit 'pretest' folder
-p --pending        visit 'pending' folder
-w --waiting        visit 'waiting' folder
-r --recheck        visit 'waiting' folder
-a --archive        visit 'archive' folder
-n --newbies        visit 'newbies' folder
-u --publish        visit 'publish' folder
-s --skipsort       skip sorting of aggregate results by age
-l --lines rows     print top 'rows' of the result object [default: 50]
-z --ping           run the connectivity check first
-h --help           show this help text
-x --usage          show help and short example usage 

where ARG... can be one or more file name, or directories or package names.

Examples:
  ciw.r -ip                            # run in 'inspect' and 'pending' mode
  ciw.r -a                             # run with mode 'auto' resolved in incoming()
  ciw.r                                # run with defaults, same as '-itpwr'

When no argument is given, 'auto' is selected which corresponds to 'inspect', 'waiting',
'pending', 'pretest', and 'recheck'. Selecting '-m' or '--mega' are select as default.

Folder selecting arguments are cumulative; but 'mega' is a single selections of all folders
(i.e. 'inspect', 'waiting', 'pending', 'pretest', 'recheck', 'archive', 'newbies', 'publish').

ciw.r is part of littler which brings 'r' to the command-line.
See https://dirk.eddelbuettel.com/code/littler.html for more information.
edd@rob:~$ 

The README at the git repo and the CRAN page offer a ‘screenshot movie’ showing some of the options in action.

I have been using the little tools quite a bit over the last two or three weeks since I first put it together and find it quite handy. With that again a big Thank You! of appcreciation for all that CRAN does—which this week included letting this past the newbies desk in under 24 hours.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/ciw | permanent link

Mon, 11 Mar 2024

digest 0.6.35 on CRAN: New xxhash code

Release 0.6.35 of the digest package arrived at CRAN today and has also been uploaded to Debian already.

digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects. It can use a number different hashing algorithms (md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, spookyhash, blake3,crc32c – and now also xxh3_64 and xxh3_128), and enables easy comparison of (potentially large and nested) R language objects as it relies on the native serialization in R. It is a mature and widely-used package (with 65.8 million downloads just on the partial cloud mirrors of CRAN which keep logs) as many tasks may involve caching of objects for which it provides convenient general-purpose hash key generation to quickly identify the various objects.

This release updates the included xxHash version to the current verion 0.8.2 updating the existing xxhash32 and xxhash64 hash functions — and also adding the newer xxh3_64 and xxh3_128 ones. We have a project at work using xxh3_128 from Python which made me realize having it from R would be nice too, and given the existing infrastructure in the package actually doing so was fairly quick and straightforward.

My CRANberries provides a summary of changes to the previous version. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo. For documentation (including the changelog) see the documentation site.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/digest | permanent link

Thu, 07 Mar 2024

prrd 0.0.6 at CRAN: Several Improvements

Thrilled to share that a new version of prrd arrived at CRAN yesterday in a first update in two and a half years. prrd facilitates the parallel running [of] reverse dependency [checks] when preparing R packages. It is used extensively for releases I make of Rcpp, RcppArmadillo, RcppEigen, BH, and others.

prrd screenshot image

The key idea of prrd is simple, and described in some more detail on its webpage and its GitHub repo. Reverse dependency checks are an important part of package development that is easily done in a (serial) loop. But these checks are also generally embarassingly parallel as there is no or little interdependency between them (besides maybe shared build depedencies). See the (dated) screenshot (running six parallel workers, arranged in a split byobu session).

This release, the first since 2021, brings a number of enhancments. In particular, the summary function is now improved in several ways. Josh also put in a nice PR that generalizes some setup defaults and values.

The release is summarised in the NEWS entry:

Changes in prrd version 0.0.6 (2024-03-06)

  • The summary function has received several enhancements:

    • Extended summary is only running when failures are seen.

    • The summariseQueue function now displays an anticipated completion time and remaining duration.

    • The use of optional package foghorn has been refined, and refactored, when running summaries.

  • The dequeueJobs.r scripts can receive a date argument, the date can be parse via anydate if anytime ins present.

  • The enqueeJobs.r now considers skipped package when running 'addfailed' while ensuring selecting packages are still on CRAN.

  • The CI setup has been updated (twice),

  • Enqueing and dequing functions and scripts now support relative directories, updated documentation (#18 by Joshua Ulrich).

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/prrd | permanent link

Mon, 04 Mar 2024

tinythemes 0.0.2 at CRAN: Maintenance

A first maintenance of the still fairly new package tinythemes arrived on CRAN today. tinythemes provides the theme_ipsum_rc() function from hrbrthemes by Bob Rudis in a zero (added) dependency way. A simple example is (also available as a demo inside the package) contrasts the default style (on left) with the one added by this package (on the right):

This version mostly just updates to the newest releases of ggplot2 as one must, and takes advantage of Bob’s update to hrbrthemes yesterday.

The full set of changes since the initial CRAN release follows.

Changes in spdl version 0.0.2 (2024-03-04)

  • Added continuous integrations action based on r2u

  • Added demo/ directory and a READNE.md

  • Minor edits to help page content

  • Synchronised with ggplot2 3.5.0 via hrbrthemes

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the repo where comments and suggestions are welcome.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/tinythemes | permanent link

Sun, 03 Mar 2024

RcppArmadillo 0.12.8.1.0 on CRAN: Upstream Fix, Interface Polish

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 1130 other packages on CRAN, downloaded 32.8 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 578 times according to Google Scholar.

This release brings a new upstream bugfix release Armadillo 12.8.1 prepared by Conrad yesterday. It was delayed for a few hours as CRAN noticed an error in one package which we all concluded was spurious as it could be reproduced outside of the one run there. Following from the previous release, we also use the slighty faster ‘Lighter’ header in the examples. And once it got to CRAN I also updated the Debian package.

The set of changes since the last CRAN release follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.12.8.1.0 (2024-03-02)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 12.8.1 (Cortisol Injector)

    • Workaround in norm() for yet another bug in macOS accelerate framework
  • Update README for RcppArmadillo usage counts

  • Update examples to use '#include <RcppArmadillo/Lighter>' for faster compilation excluding unused Rcpp features

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the Rcpp R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Wed, 28 Feb 2024

RcppEigen 0.3.4.0.0 on CRAN: New Upstream, At Last

We are thrilled to share that RcppEigen has now upgraded to Eigen release 3.4.0! The new release 0.3.4.0.0 arrived on CRAN earlier today, and has been shipped to Debian as well. Eigen is a C++ template library for linear algebra: matrices, vectors, numerical solvers, and related algorithms.

This update has been in the works for a full two and a half years! It all started with a PR #102 by Yixuan bringing the package-local changes for R integration forward to usptream release 3.4.0. We opened issue #103 to steer possible changes from reverse-dependency checking through. Lo and behold, this just … stalled because a few substantial changes were needed and not coming. But after a long wait, and like a bolt out of a perfectly blue sky, Andrew revived it in January with a reverse depends run of his own along with a set of PRs. That was the push that was needed, and I steered it along with a number of reverse dependency checks, and occassional emails to maintainers. We managed to bring it down to only three packages having a hickup, and all three had received PRs thanks to Andrew – and even merged them. So the plan became to release today following a final fourteen day window. And CRAN was convinced by our arguments that we followed due process. So there it is! Big big thanks to all who helped it along, especially Yixuan and Andrew but also Mikael who updated another patch set he had prepared for the previous release series.

The complete NEWS file entry follows.

Changes in RcppEigen version 0.3.4.0.0 (2024-02-28)

  • The Eigen version has been upgrade to release 3.4.0 (Yixuan)

  • Extensive reverse-dependency checks ensure only three out of over 400 packages at CRAN are affected; PRs and patches helped other packages

  • The long-running branch also contains substantial contributions from Mikael Jagan (for the lme4 interface) and Andrew Johnson (revdep PRs)

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the most recent release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Thu, 08 Feb 2024

RcppArmadillo 0.12.8.0.0 on CRAN: New Upstream, Interface Polish

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 1119 other packages on CRAN, downloaded 32.5 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 575 times according to Google Scholar.

This release brings a new (stable) upstream (minor) release Armadillo 12.8.0 prepared by Conrad two days ago. We, as usual, prepared a release candidate which we tested against the over 1100 CRAN packages using RcppArmadillo. This found no issues, which was confirmed by CRAN once we uploaded and so it arrived as a new release today in a fully automated fashion.

We also made a small change that had been prepared by GitHub issue #400: a few internal header files that were cluttering the top-level of the include directory have been moved to internal directories. The standard header is of course unaffected, and the set of ‘full / light / lighter / lightest’ headers (matching we did a while back in Rcpp) also continue to work as one expects. This change was also tested in a full reverse-dependency check in January but had not been released to CRAN yet.

The set of changes since the last CRAN release follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.12.8.0.0 (2024-02-06)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 12.8.0 (Cortisol Injector)

    • Faster detection of symmetric expressions by pinv() and rank()

    • Expanded shift() to handle sparse matrices

    • Expanded conv_to for more flexible conversions between sparse and dense matrices

    • Added cbrt()

    • More compact representation of integers when saving matrices in CSV format

  • Five non-user facing top-level include files have been removed (#432 closing #400 and building on #395 and #396)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the Rcpp R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Thu, 01 Feb 2024

RQuantLib 0.4.21 on CRAN: Maintenance

A new minor release 0.4.21 of RQuantLib arrived at CRAN this afternoon, and has already been uploaded to Debian as well.

QuantLib is a rather comprehensice free/open-source library for quantitative finance. RQuantLib connects (some parts of) it to the R environment and language, and has been part of CRAN for more than twenty years (!!) as it was one of the first packages I uploaded there.

This release of RQuantLib benefits from some kind attention that Jeroen has been paying to how we build (especially at CRAN) on both macOS and Windows. So the build processes are a little better now, and no internal code changed. QuantLib 1.33 built unchanged.

Changes in RQuantLib version 0.4.21 (2024-02-01)

  • Generalize macOS build to universal build (Jeroen in #179)

  • Generalize Windows build to arm64 (Jeroen in #181)

  • Generalize version string use to support cmake use (Jeroen in #181 fixing #180)

  • Minor update to 'ci.yaml' github action (Dirk)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the this release. As always, more detailed information is on the RQuantLib page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rquantlib-devel mailing list. Issue tickets can be filed at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rquantlib | permanent link

Wed, 31 Jan 2024

dtts 0.1.2 on CRAN: Maintenance

Leonardo and I are happy to announce the release of a very minor maintenance release 0.1.2 of our dtts package which has been on CRAN for a little under two years now.

dtts builds upon our nanotime package as well as the beloved data.table to bring high-performance and high-resolution indexing at the nanosecond level to data frames. dtts aims to offers the time-series indexing versatility of xts (and zoo) to the immense power of data.table while supporting highest nanosecond resolution.

This release follows yesterday’s long-awaited release of data.table version 1.5.0 which had been some time in the making as the first new major.minor release since Matt drifted into being less active and the forefront. The release also renamed the one C-level API accessor to data.table (which was added, if memory serves, by Leonardo with our use in mind). So we have to catch up to the renamed identifier; this release does that, and adds a versioned imports statement on data.table.

The short list of changes follows.

Changes in version 0.1.2 (2024-01-31)

  • Update the one exported C-level identifier from data.table following its 1.5.0 release and a renaming

  • Routine continuous integration updates

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a report with diffstat for this release. Questions, comments, issue tickets can be brought to the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/dtts | permanent link

Wed, 24 Jan 2024

qlcal 0.0.10 on CRAN: Calendar Updates

The tenth release of the qlcal package arrivied at CRAN today.

qlcal delivers the calendaring parts of QuantLib. It is provided (for the R package) as a set of included files, so the package is self-contained and does not depend on an external QuantLib library (which can be demanding to build). qlcal covers over sixty country / market calendars and can compute holiday lists, its complement (i.e. business day lists) and much more. Examples are in the README at the repository, the package page, and course at the CRAN package page.

This releases synchronizes qlcal with the QuantLib release 1.33 and its updates to 2024 calendars.

Changes in version 0.0.10 (2024-01-24)

  • Synchronized with QuantLib 1.33

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report for this release. See the project page and package documentation for more details, and more examples.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/qlcal | permanent link

RApiDatetime 0.0.9 on CRAN: Maintenance

A new maintenance release of our RApiDatetime package is now on CRAN

RApiDatetime provides a number of entry points for C-level functions of the R API for Date and Datetime calculations. The functions asPOSIXlt and asPOSIXct convert between long and compact datetime representation, formatPOSIXlt and Rstrptime convert to and from character strings, and POSIXlt2D and D2POSIXlt convert between Date and POSIXlt datetime. Lastly, asDatePOSIXct converts to a date type. All these functions are rather useful, but were not previously exported by R for C-level use by other packages. Which this package aims to change.

This release responds to a CRAN request to clean up empty macros and sections in Rd files. Moreover, because the windows portion of the corresponding R-internal code underwent some changes, our (#ifdef conditional) coverage here is a little behind and created a warning under the newer UCRT setup. So starting with this release we are back to OS_type: unix meaning there will not be any Windows builds at CRAN. If you would like that to change, and ideally can work in the Windows portion, do not hesitate to get in touch.

Details of the release follow based on the NEWS file.

Changes in RApiDatetime version 0.0.9 (2024-01-23)

  • Replace auto-generated stale RApitDatetime-package.Rd with macro-filled stanza to satisfy CRAN request.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Tue, 23 Jan 2024

RcppAnnoy 0.0.22 on CRAN: Maintenance

annoy image

A very minor maintenance release, now at version 0.0.22, of RcppAnnoy has arrived on CRAN.

RcppAnnoy is the Rcpp-based R integration of the nifty Annoy library by Erik Bernhardsson. Annoy is a small and lightweight C++ template header library for very fast approximate nearest neighbours—originally developed to drive the Spotify music discovery algorithm. It had all the buzzwords already a decade ago: it is one of the algorithms behind (drum roll …) vector search as it finds approximate matches very quickly and also allows to persist the data.

This release responds to a CRAN request to clean up empty macros and sections in Rd files.

Details of the release follow based on the NEWS file.

Changes in version 0.0.22 (2024-01-23)

  • Replace empty examples macro to satisfy CRAN request.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Mon, 22 Jan 2024

x13binary 1.1.60 on CRAN: Upstream Update, Updated Build

The x13binary team is thrilled to share the availability of Release 1.1.60-1 of the x13binary package providing the X-13ARIMA-SEATS program by the US Census Bureau which arrived on CRAN earlier today.

This release brings the package up to speed with the most current release by the Census Bureau. More importantly, we finally made good on an old promise to ourselves and now install the binary by compiling from its Fortran sources! No more pre-made binaries. This required some work by Kirill, Michael, and Jeroen to finalize matter because, as we all know, the CRAN build processes and tool chains can be a little byzantine in their details. Use on platforms not covered by binaries from CRAN (or r-universe) should just work too as the demands on the (Fortran) compiler are fairly standard. All in all the build is fairly lightweight and quick even when rebuilding from source.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release showing changes to the previous release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Sun, 21 Jan 2024

RProtoBuf 0.4.22 on CRAN: Updated Windows Support!

A new maintenance release 0.4.22 of RProtoBuf arrived on CRAN earlier today. RProtoBuf provides R with bindings for the Google Protocol Buffers (“ProtoBuf”) data encoding and serialization library used and released by Google, and deployed very widely in numerous projects as a language and operating-system agnostic protocol.

This release matches the recent 0.4.21 release which enabled use of the package with newer ProtoBuf releases. Tomas has been updating the Windows / rtools side of things, and supplied us with simple PR that will enable building with those updated versions once finalised.

The following section from the NEWS.Rd file has full details.

Changes in RProtoBuf version 0.4.22 (2022-12-13)

  • Apply patch by Tomas Kalibera to support updated rtools to build with newer ProtoBuf releases on windows

Thanks to my CRANberries, there is a diff to the previous release. The RProtoBuf page has copies of the (older) package vignette, the ‘quick’ overview vignette, and the pre-print of our JSS paper. Questions, comments etc should go to the GitHub issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Fri, 12 Jan 2024

RcppSpdlog 0.0.16 on CRAN: New Upstream

Version 0.0.16 of RcppSpdlog is now on CRAN and will be uploaded to Debian. RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovich. You can learn more at the nice package documention site.

This releases updates the code to the version 1.13 of spdlog which was release this morning.

The NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in RcppSpdlog version 0.0.16 (2024-01-12)

  • Upgraded to upstream releases spdlog 1.13.0

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report. More detailed information is on the RcppSpdlog page, or the package documention site.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

RDieHarder 0.2.6 on CRAN: Maintenance

An new version 0.2.6 of the random-number generator tester RDieHarder (based on the DieHarder suite developed / maintained by Robert Brown with contributions by David Bauer and myself along with other contributors) is now on CRAN (and to the day year after the previous release).

This release contains changes to printf format strings to avoid new warnings on Windows. No functional changes have been made.

Thanks to CRANberries, you can also look at the most recent diff to the previous release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rdieharder | permanent link

Thu, 11 Jan 2024

digest 0.6.34 on CRAN: Maintanance

Release 0.6.34 of the digest package arrived at CRAN today and has also been uploaded to Debian already.

digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects. It can use a number different hashing algorithms (md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, spookyhash, blake3, and crc32c), and ebales easy comparison of (potentially large and nested) R language objects as it relies on the native serialization in R. It is a mature and widely-used package (with 63.8 million downloads just on the partial cloud mirrors of CRAN which keep logs) as many tasks may involve caching of objects for which it provides convenient general-purpose hash key generation to quickly identify the various objects.

(Oh and we also just passed the 20th anniversary of the initial CRAN upload. Time flies, as they say.)

This release contains small (build-focussed) enhancements contributed by Michael Chirico, and another set of fixed for printf format warnings this time on Windows.

My CRANberries provides a summary of changes to the previous version. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Wed, 10 Jan 2024

BH 1.84.0-1 on CRAN: New Upstream

Boost

Boost is a very large and comprehensive set of (peer-reviewed) libraries for the C++ programming language, containing well over one hundred individual libraries. The BH package provides a sizeable subset of header-only libraries for (easier, no linking required) use by R. It is fairly widely used: the (partial) CRAN mirror logs (aggregated from the cloud mirrors) show over 35.7 million package downloads.

Version 1.84.0 of Boost was released in December following the regular Boost release schedule of April, August and December releases. As the commits and changelog show, we packaged it almost immediately and started testing following our annual update cycle which strives to balance being close enough to upstream and not stressing CRAN and the user base too much. The reverse depends check revealed five packages requiring changes or adjustments which is a pretty good outcome given the over three hundred direct reverse dependencies. So we opened issue #100 to coordinate the issue over the winter break during which CRAN also closes (just as we did in previous years). Our sincere thanks to the two packages that already updated before, and to the one that updated today within hours (!!) of the BH uploaded it needed.

There are very few actual changes. We honoured one request (in issue #97) to add Boost QVM bringing quarternion support to R. No other new changes needed to be made. A number of changes I have to make each time in BH, and it is worth mentioning them. Because CRAN cares about backwards compatibility and the ability to be used on minimal or older systems, we still adjust the filenames of a few files to fit a jurassic constraints of just over a 100 characters per filepath present in some long-outdated versions of tar. Not a big deal. We also, and that is more controversial, silence a number of #pragma diagnostic messages for g++ and clang++ because CRAN insists on it. I have no choice in that matter. One warning we suppressed last year, but no longer do, concerns the C++14 standard that some Boost libraries now default to. Packages setting C++11 explicitly will likely get a note from CRAN changing this; in most cases that should be trivial to remove as we only had to opt into (then) newer standards under old compilers. These days newer defaults help; R itself now defaults to C++17.

Changes in version 1.84.0-0 (2024-01-09)

Via my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to the previous release. Comments and suggestions about BH are welcome via the issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/bh | permanent link

Tue, 09 Jan 2024

Rcpp 1.0.12 on CRAN: New Maintenance / Update Release

rcpp logo

The Rcpp Core Team is once again thrilled to announce a new release 1.0.12 of the Rcpp package. It arrived on CRAN early today, and has since been uploaded to Debian as well. Windows and macOS builds should appear at CRAN in the next few days, as will builds in different Linux distribution–and of course at r2u should catch up tomorrow. The release was uploaded yesterday, and run its reverse dependencies overnight. Rcpp always gets flagged nomatter what because the grandfathered .Call(symbol) but … we had not single ‘change to worse’ among over 2700 reverse dependencies!

This release continues with the six-months January-July cycle started with release 1.0.5 in July 2020. As a reminder, we do of course make interim snapshot ‘dev’ or ‘rc’ releases available via the Rcpp drat repo and strongly encourage their use and testing—I run my systems with these versions which tend to work just as well, and are also fully tested against all reverse-dependencies.

Rcpp has long established itself as the most popular way of enhancing R with C or C++ code. Right now, 2791 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further, along with 254 in BioConductor. On CRAN, 13.8% of all packages depend (directly) on Rcpp, and 59.9% of all compiled packages do. From the cloud mirror of CRAN (which is but a subset of all CRAN downloads), Rcpp has been downloaded 78.1 million times. The two published papers (also included in the package as preprint vignettes) have, respectively, 1766 (JSS, 2011) and 292 (TAS, 2018) citations, while the the book (Springer useR!, 2013) has another 617.

This release is incremental as usual, generally preserving existing capabilities faithfully while smoothing our corners and / or extending slightly, sometimes in response to changing and tightened demands from CRAN or R standards.

The full list below details all changes, their respective PRs and, if applicable, issue tickets. Big thanks from all of us to all contributors!

Changes in Rcpp release version 1.0.12 (2024-01-08)

  • Changes in Rcpp API:

    • Missing header includes as spotted by some recent tools were added in two places (Michael Chirico in #1272 closing #1271).

    • Casts to avoid integer overflow in matrix row/col selections have neem added (Aaron Lun #1281).

    • Three print format correction uncovered by R-devel were applied with thanks to Tomas Kalibera (Dirk in #1285).

    • Correct a print format correction in the RcppExports glue code (Dirk in #1288 fixing #1287).

    • The upcoming OBJSXP addition to R 4.4.0 is supported in the type2name mapper (Dirk and Iñaki in #1293).

  • Changes in Rcpp Attributes:

    • Generated interface code from base R that fails under LTO is now corrected (Iñaki in #1274 fixing a StackOverflow issue).
  • Changes in Rcpp Documentation:

    • The caption for third figure in the introductory vignette has been corrected (Dirk in #1277 fixing #1276).

    • A small formatting issue was correct in an Rd file as noticed by R-devel (Dirk in #1282).

    • The Rcpp FAQ vignette has been updated (Dirk in #1284).

    • The Rcpp.bib file has been refreshed to current package versions.

  • Changes in Rcpp Deployment:

    • The RcppExports file for an included test package has been updated (Dirk in #1289).

Thanks to my CRANberries, you can also look at a diff to the previous release Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page. Bugs reports are welcome at the GitHub issue tracker as well (where one can also search among open or closed issues).

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Mon, 18 Dec 2023

tinythemes 0.0.1 at CRAN: New Package

Delighted to announce a new package that arrived on CRAN today: tinythemes. It repackages the theme_ipsum_rc() function by Bob Rudis from his hrbrthemes package in a zero (added) dependency way. A simple example is (also available as a demo inside the packages in the next update) contrasts the default style (on left) with the one added by this package (on the right):

The GitHub repo also shows this little example: total dependencies of hrbrthemes over what ggplot2 installs:

> db <- tools::CRAN_package_db()
> deps <- tools::package_dependencies(c("ggplot2", "hrbrthemes"), recursive=TRUE, db=db
> Filter(\(x) x != "ggplot2", setdiff(deps[[2]], deps[[1]]))
 [1] "extrafont"         "knitr"             "rmarkdown"         "htmltools"        
 [5] "tools"             "gdtools"           "extrafontdb"       "Rttf2pt1"         
 [9] "Rcpp"              "systemfonts"       "gfonts"            "curl"             
[13] "fontquiver"        "base64enc"         "digest"            "ellipsis"         
[17] "fastmap"           "evaluate"          "highr"             "xfun"             
[21] "yaml"              "bslib"             "fontawesome"       "jquerylib"        
[25] "jsonlite"          "stringr"           "tinytex"           "cachem"           
[29] "memoise"           "mime"              "sass"              "fontBitstreamVera"
[33] "fontLiberation"    "shiny"             "crul"              "crayon"           
[37] "stringi"           "cpp11"             "urltools"          "httpcode"         
[41] "fs"                "rappdirs"          "httpuv"            "xtable"           
[45] "sourcetools"       "later"             "promises"          "commonmark"       
[49] "triebeard"        
>

Comments and suggestions are welcome at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/tinythemes | permanent link

Sun, 17 Dec 2023

littler 0.3.19 on CRAN: Several Updates

max-heap image

The twentieth release of littler as a CRAN package landed a few minutes ago, following in the now seventeen year history (!!) as a package started by Jeff in 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later.

littler is the first command-line interface for R as it predates Rscript. It allows for piping as well for shebang scripting via #!, uses command-line arguments more consistently and still starts faster. It also always loaded the methods package which Rscript only began to do in recent years.

littler lives on Linux and Unix, has its difficulties on macOS due to yet-another-braindeadedness there (who ever thought case-insensitive filesystems as a default were a good idea?) and simply does not exist on Windows (yet – the build system could be extended – see RInside for an existence proof, and volunteers are welcome!). See the FAQ vignette on how to add it to your PATH. A few examples are highlighted at the Github repo:, as well as in the examples vignette.

This release contains a fair number of small changes and improvements to some of the example scripts is run daily.

The full change description follows.

Changes in littler version 0.3.19 (2023-12-17)

  • Changes in examples scripts

    • The help or usage text display for r2u.r, ttt.r, check.r has been improved, expanded or corrected, respectively

    • installDeps.r has a new argument for dependency selection

    • An initial 'single test file' runner tttf.r has been added

    • r2u.r has two new options for setting / varying the Debian build version of package that is built, and one for BioConductor builds, one for a 'dry run' build, and a new --compile option

    • installRSPM.r, installPPM.r, installP3M.r have been updates to reflect the name changes

    • installRub.r now understands 'package@universe' too

    • tt.r flips the default of the --effects switch

My CRANberries service provides a comparison to the previous release. Full details for the littler release are provided as usual at the ChangeLog page, and also on the package docs website. The code is available via the GitHub repo, from tarballs and now of course also from its CRAN page and via install.packages("littler"). Binary packages are available directly in Debian as well as (in a day or two) Ubuntu binaries at CRAN thanks to the tireless Michael Rutter.

Comments and suggestions are welcome at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/littler | permanent link

Wed, 13 Dec 2023

RProtoBuf 0.4.21 on CRAN: Updated Upstream Support!

An exciting new release 0.4.21 of RProtoBuf arrived on CRAN earlier today. RProtoBuf provides R with bindings for the Google Protocol Buffers (“ProtoBuf”) data encoding and serialization library used and released by Google, and deployed very widely in numerous projects as a language and operating-system agnostic protocol.

ProtoBuf development, following what seemed like a multi-year lull, all of a sudden picked up again with a vengeance a little while ago. And the library releases we rely on for convenience and provided by the Linux distributions are lagging. So last summer we received an excellent, and focussed, pull request #93 offering to update the package to the newer ProtoBuf 22.0 and beyond. (Aside: When a library ditches its numbering scheme you know changes are ‘for real’. My Ubuntu 23.10 box is still at 3.21 in a different counting scheme .) But it wasn’t until last weekend the issue ticket #95 by Sebastian ran into the same issue, but recognized it … and contained a container recipe! So now all of a sudden we were able to build under a newer ProtoBuf which made accepting the PR #93 much easier! We added this as an additional continuous unit test, and made a few other smaller updates to documentation and style.

The following section from the NEWS.Rd file has full details.

Changes in RProtoBuf version 0.4.21 (2022-12-13)

  • Package now builds with ProtoBuf >= 22.x thanks to Matteo Gianella (#93 addressing #92).

  • An Alpine 3.19-based workflow was added to test this in continuous integration thanks to a suggestion by Sebastian Meyer.

  • A large number of old-style .Call were updated (#96).

  • Several packaging, dcoumentation and testing items were updated.

Thanks to my CRANberries, there is a diff to the previous release. The RProtoBuf page has copies of the (older) package vignette, the ‘quick’ overview vignette, and the pre-print of our JSS paper. Questions, comments etc should go to the GitHub issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rprotobuf | permanent link

Sat, 09 Dec 2023

RcppInt64 0.0.4 on CRAN: Minor Bugfix

The new-ish package RcppInt64 (announced earlier this fall in this post, with two small updates following) arrived on CRAN minutes ago as relase 0.0.4. RcppInt64 collects some of the previous conversions between 64-bit integer values in R and C++, and regroups them in a single package. It offers two interfaces: both a more standard as<>() converter from R values along with its companions wrap() to return to R, as well as more dedicated functions ‘from’ and ‘to’.

This release addresses an issues Sebastian reported a few hours and which is reported by newer, pickier compilers: We need to include <cstdint> so that int64_t is declared. CRAN was at its usual best processing this efficiently including tests of the by now two reverse dependencies. Twenty two minutes total, all automated:

The brief NEWS entry follows:

Changes in version 0.0.4 (2023-12-09)

  • The cstdint header is now included (closes #1).

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Mon, 04 Dec 2023

RcppArmadillo 0.12.6.6.1 on CRAN: No More Deprecation

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 1126 other packages on CRAN, downloaded 31.7 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 569 times according to Google Scholar.

This release ends the practice on asking Armadillo to suppress deprecation warnings. RcppArmadillo, as noted, has a large user base. Sometimes Conrad sometimes made changes without too much of a heads-up so at times it was opportune to not bring those warnings to dozens (or maybe hundreds) of packages at CRAN. Yet we need to balance this with the demonstrable need to call out older deprecated code use. So sixteen months ago, with GitHub issue #391, we started to alert author of 30+ affected packages and supplied either pull requests or emailed patches to all. Eleven months ago GitHub issues #402 was added for a second deprecation.

And the time of making the switch has come. Release 0.12.6.6.1 no longer defines ARMA_IGNORE_DEPRECATED_MARKER. So among the over 1100 packages using RcppArmadillo at CRAN, around a good dozen or so were flagged in the upload – but CRAN concurred and let the package migrate to CRAN.

If you maintain an affected package, consider applying the patch or pull request now. A simple stop-gap measure also exists by adding -DARMA_IGNORE_DEPRECATED_MARKER to src/Makevars as either PKG_CPPFLAGS or PKG_CXXFLAGS to reactivate it. But a proper code update, which is generally simple, may be better. If you are unsure, do not hesitate to get in touch.

The set of changes since the last CRAN release follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.12.6.6.1 (2023-12-03)

  • Following the extendeded transition in #391 and #402, this release no longer sets ARMA_IGNORE_DEPRECATED_MARKER. Maintainers of affected packages have received pull requests or patches and can set -DARMA_IGNORE_DEPRECATED_MARKER as PKG_CPPFLAGS.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the Rcpp R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sat, 02 Dec 2023

dang 0.0.16: New Features, Some Maintenance

A new release of my mixed collection of things package dang package arrived at CRAN a little while ago. The dang package regroups a few functions of mine that had no other home as for example lsos() from a StackOverflow question from 2009 (!!), the overbought/oversold price band plotter from an older blog post, the market monitor blogged about as well as the checkCRANStatus() function tweeted about by Tim Taylor. And more so take a look.

This release brings a number of updates, including a rather nice improvement to the market monitor making updates buttery smooth and not flickering (with big thanks to Paul Murrell who calmly pointed out once again … that base R does of course have the functionality I was seeking) as well as three new functions (!!) and then a little maintenance on the -Wformat print format string issue that kept ‘everybody’ busy this week.

The NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.0.16 (2023-12-02)

  • Added new function str.language() based on post by Bill Dunlap

  • Added new argument sleep in intradayMarketMonitor

  • Switched to dev.hold() and dev.flush() in intradayMarketMonitor with thanks to Paul Murrell

  • Updated continued integration setup, twice, and package badges

  • Added new function shadowedPackages

  • Added new function limitDataTableCores

  • Updated two error() calls to updated tidyCpp signature to not tickle -Wformat warnings under R-devel

  • Updated two URL to please link checks in R-devel

  • Switch two tests for variable of variable to is.* and inherits(), respectively

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to [the previous release][previous releases]. For questions or comments use the the issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/dang | permanent link

tidyCpp 0.0.7 on CRAN: Maintenance

A maintenance release of the tidyCpp package arrived on CRAN this morning. The packages offers a clean C++ layer (as well as one small C++ helper class) on top of the C API for R which aims to make use of this robust (if awkward) C API a little easier and more consistent. See the vignette for motivating examples.

This release follows a number of other releases this week in accomodating the recently added -Wformat -Wformat-security from the development branch of R. It also includes a new example snippet illustrating creation of a numeric matrix.

The NEWS entry follows.

Changes in tidyCpp version 0.0.7 (2023-11-30)

  • Add an example for a numeric matrix creator

  • Update the continuous integration setup

  • Accomodate print format warnings from r-devel

Thanks to my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release. For questions, suggestions, or issues please use the issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/tidycpp | permanent link

Thu, 30 Nov 2023

RcppClassicExamples 0.1.3 on CRAN: Maintenance

Another upgrade triggered solely by changing CRAN standards (see previous one from five years ago). This time it concerns warnings under r-devel with -Wformat -Wformat-security so we injected a number of "%s" into Rf_error() calls.

No new code or features. Full details below. And as a reminder, don’t use the old RcppClassic – use Rcpp instead.

Changes in version 0.1.3 (2023-11-30)

  • Update Rf_error() call to not tickle -Wformat

  • Minor other packaging and continuous integration tweaks

Thanks to CRANberries, you can also look at a diff to the previous release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Wed, 29 Nov 2023

RcppSpdlog 0.0.15 on CRAN: Maintenance

Version 0.0.15 of RcppSpdlog is now on CRAN and will be uploaded to Debian. RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovich. You can learn more at the nice package documention site.

This releases updates the code to address warning now shown under R-devel when -Wformat -Wformat-security are enabled. This amounted to re-generating RcppExports.cpp under an updated [Rcpp][rcpp] version. It also updates the package default help page by removing some stubs that were not filled in.

The NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in RcppSpdlog version 0.0.15 (2023-11-29)

  • Correct default package help page slighly

  • RcppExports.cpp has been regenerated under an updated Rcpp to address a format string warning under R-devel

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report. More detailed information is on the RcppSpdlog page, or the package documention site.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

qlcal 0.0.9 on CRAN: Maintenance

The ninth release of the qlcal package arrivied at CRAN today.

qlcal delivers the calendaring parts of QuantLib. It is provided (for the R package) as a set of included files, so the package is self-contained and does not depend on an external QuantLib library (which can be demanding to build). qlcal covers over sixty country / market calendars and can compute holiday lists, its complement (i.e. business day lists) and much more.

This releases updates the code to address warning now shown under R-devel when -Wformat -Wformat-security are enabled. This amounted to re-generating RcppExports.cpp under an updated Rcpp version. We also no longer set C++14 explicitly as a compilation standard but rather determine at build time if it is needed or not.

Changes in version 0.0.9 (2023-11-29)

  • configure now uses a new helper script to only set a compilation standard when needed for R versions older than 4.2.0

  • The file RcppExports.cpp was regenerated to avoid a string format warning from R-devel

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report for this release. See the project page and package documentation for more details, and more examples.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/qlcal | permanent link

RcppQuantuccia 0.1.1 on CRAN: Maintenance

A minor release of RcppQuantuccia arrived on CRAN today. RcppQuantuccia started from the Quantuccia header-only subset / variant of QuantLib which it brings it to R. This project validated the idea of making the calendaring functionality of QuantLib available in a more compact and standalone project – which we now do with qlcal which can be seen as a successor to this.

This releases updates the code to address warning now shown under R-devel when -Wformat -Wformat-security are enabled. This amounted to re-generating RcppExports.cpp under an updated Rcpp version. We also no longer set C++14 explicitly as a compilation standard.

The complete list changes for this release follows.

Changes in version 0.1.2 (2023-11-29)

  • RcppExports.cpp has been regenerated under an updated Rcpp to address a format string warning under R-devel

  • The compilation standard is no longer set to C++14

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report relative to the previous release. More information is on the RcppQuantuccia page. Issues and bugreports should go to the GitHub issue tracker.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 28 Nov 2023

RcppSimdJson 0.1.11 on CRAN: Maintenance

A new maintenance release 0.1.11 of the RcppSimdJson package is now on CRAN.

RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire and collaborators. Via very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle per byte parsed; see the video of the talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon.

This release responds to a CRAN request to address issues now identified by -Wformat -Wformat-security. These are frequently pretty simple changes as it was here: all it took was an call to compileAttributes() from an updated Rcpp version which now injects "%s" as a format string when calling Rf_error().

The (very short) NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in version 0.1.11 (2023-11-28)

  • RcppExports.cpp has been regenerated under an update Rcpp to address a print format warning (Dirk in #88).

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release. For questions, suggestions, or issues please use the issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Mon, 27 Nov 2023

RcppCNPy 0.2.12 on CRAN: More Maintenance

A new (and again somewhat minor) maintenance release of the RcppCNPy package arrived on CRAN earlier today.

RcppCNPy provides R with read and write access to NumPy files thanks to the cnpy library by Carl Rogers along with Rcpp for the glue to R.

Recent changes in r-devel hone in on issues concerning printf format string inaccuracies the compiler can detect via the -Wformat -Wformat-security flags. Two fairly simplye ones were present here and have been addressed. In the time since the last release about twenty months ago two or three other minor packaging and setup details have also been taken care of, details are below.

Changes in version 0.2.12 (2022-11-27)

  • The continuous integration workflow received a trivial update, twice.

  • The C++ compilation standard is now implicit per CRAN and R preference.

  • The CITATION file format has been updated for the current usage.

  • Two print format string issues reported by current R-devel have been addressed.

CRANberries also provides a diffstat report for the latest release. As always, feedback is welcome and the best place to start a discussion may be the GitHub issue tickets page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sun, 26 Nov 2023

RQuantLib 0.4.20 on CRAN: More Maintenance

A new release 0.4.20 of RQuantLib arrived at CRAN earlier today, and has already been uploaded to Debian as well.

QuantLib is a rather comprehensice free/open-source library for quantitative finance. RQuantLib connects (some parts of) it to the R environment and language, and has been part of CRAN for more than twenty years (!!) as it was one of the first packages I uploaded there.

This release of RQuantLib brings a few more updates for nags triggered by recent changes in the upcoming R release (aka ‘r-devel’, usually due in April). The Rd parser now identifies curly braces that lack a preceding macro, usually a typo as it was here which affected three files. The printf (or alike) format checker found two more small issues. The run-time checker for examples was unhappy with the callable bond example so we only run it in interactive mode now. Lastly I had alread commented-out the setting for a C++14 compilation (required by the remaining Boost headers) as C++14 has been the default since R 4.2.0 (with suitable compilers, at least). Those who need it explicitly will have to uncomment the line in src/Makevars.in. Lastly, the expand printf format strings also found a need for a small change in Rcpp so the development version (now 1.0.11.5) has that addressed; the change will be part of Rcpp 1.0.12 in January.

Changes in RQuantLib version 0.4.20 (2023-11-26)

  • Correct three help pages with stray curly braces

  • Correct two printf format strings

  • Comment-out explicit selection of C++14

  • Wrap one example inside 'if (interactive())' to not exceed total running time limit at CRAN checks

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the this release 0.4.20. As always, more detailed information is on the RQuantLib page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rquantlib-devel mailing list. Issue tickets can be filed at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rquantlib | permanent link

Fri, 03 Nov 2023

RcppEigen 0.3.3.9.4 on CRAN: Maintenance, Matrix Changes

A new release 0.3.3.9.4 of RcppEigen arrived on CRAN yesterday, and went to Debian today. Eigen is a C++ template library for linear algebra: matrices, vectors, numerical solvers, and related algorithms.

This update contains a small amount of the usual maintenance (see below), along with a very nice pull request by Mikael Jagan which simplifies to interface with the Matrix package and inparticular the CHOLMOD library that is part of SuiteSparse. This release is coordinated with lme4 and OpenMx which are also being updated.

The complete NEWS file entry follows.

Changes in RcppEigen version 0.3.3.9.4 (2023-11-01)

  • The CITATION file has been updated for the new bibentry style.

  • The package skeleton generator has been updated and no longer sets an Imports:.

  • Some README.md URLs and badged have been updated.

  • The use of -fopenmp has been documented in Makevars, and a simple thread-count reporting function has been added.

  • The old manual src/init.c has been replaced by an autogenerated version, the RcppExports file have regenerated

  • The interface to package Matrix has been updated and simplified thanks to an excllent patch by Mikael Jagan.

  • The new upload is coordinated with packages lme4 and OpenMx.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the most recent release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 31 Oct 2023

RcppArmadillo 0.12.6.6.0 on CRAN: Bugfix, Thread Throttling

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 1110 other packages on CRAN, downloaded 31.2 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 563 times according to Google Scholar.

This release brings upstream bugfix releases 12.6.5 (sparse matrix corner case) and 12.6.6 with an ARPACK correction. Conrad released it this this morning, I had been running reverse dependency checks anyway and knew we were in good shape so for once I did not await a full run against the now over 1100 (!!) packages using RcppArmadillo.

This release also contains a change I prepared on Sunday and which helps with much-criticized (and rightly I may add) insistence by CRAN concerning ‘throttling’. The motivation is understandable: CRAN tests many packages at once on beefy servers and can ill afford tests going off and requesting numerous cores. But rather than providing a global setting at their end, CRAN insists that each package (!!) deals with this. The recent traffic on the helpful-as-ever r-pkg-devel mailing clearly shows that this confuses quite a few package developers. Some have admitted to simply turning examples and tests off: a net loss for all of us. Now, Armadillo defaults to using up to eight cores (which is enough to upset CRAN) when running with OpenMP (which is generally only on Linux for “reasons” I rather not get into…). With this release I expose a helper functions (from OpenMP) to limit this. I also set up an example package and repo RcppArmadilloOpenMPEx detailing this, and added a demonstration of how to use the new throttlers to the fastLm example. I hope this proves useful to users of the package.

The set of changes since the last CRAN release follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.12.6.6.0 (2023-10-31)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 12.6.6 (Cortisol Retox)

    • Fix eigs_sym(), eigs_gen() and svds() to generate deterministic results in ARPACK mode
  • Add helper functions to set and get the number of OpenMP threads

  • Store initial thread count at package load and use in thread-throttling helper (and resetter) suitable for CRAN constraints

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.12.6.5.0 (2023-10-14)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 12.6.5 (Cortisol Retox)

    • Fix for corner-case bug in handling sparse matrices with no non-zero elements

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the Rcpp R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sat, 21 Oct 2023

qlcal 0.0.8 on CRAN: QuantLib 1.32 Updates

The eighth release of the still fairly new qlcal package arrivied at CRAN today.

qlcal delivers the calendaring parts of QuantLib. It is provided (for the R package) as a set of included files, so the package is self-contained and does not depend on an external QuantLib library (which can be demanding to build). qlcal covers over sixty country / market calendars and can compute holiday lists, its complement (i.e. business day lists) and much more.

This release brings updates from the just-released QuantLib 1.32 version. It also avoids a nag from R during build (“only specify C++14 if you really need it”) but switching to a versioned depends on R 4.2.0 or later. This implies C++14 or later as the default. If you need qlcal on an older R, grab the sources, edit DESCRIPTION to remove this constraint and set the standard as before in src/Makevars (or src/Makevars.win).

Changes in version 0.0.8 (2023-10-21)

  • A small set of updates from QuantLib 1.32 have been applied

  • The explicit C++14 compilation standard has been replaced with an implicit one by relying on R (>= 4.2.0)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report for this release. See the project page and package documentation for more details, and more examples.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/qlcal | permanent link

Mon, 09 Oct 2023

drat 0.2.4 on CRAN: Improved macOS Support, General Updates

drat user

A new minor release of the drat package arrived on CRAN today making it the first release in one and a half years. drat stands for drat R Archive Template, and helps with easy-to-create and easy-to-use repositories for R packages. Since its inception in early 2015 it has found reasonably widespread adoption among R users because repositories with marked releases is the better way to distribute code.

Because for once it really is as your mother told you: Friends don’t let friends install random git commit snapshots. Properly rolled-up releases it is. Just how CRAN shows us: a model that has demonstrated for two-plus decades how to do this. And you can too: drat is easy to use, documented by six vignettes and just works. Detailed information about drat is at its documentation site. Two more blog posts using drat from GitHub Actions were just added today showing, respectively, how to add to a drat repo in either push or pull mode.

This release contains two extended PRs contributed by drat users! Both extended support for macOS: Joey Reid extended M1 support to pruning and archival, and Arne Johannes added bug-sur support. I polished a few more things around the edges, mostly documentation or continuos-integrations related.

The NEWS file summarises the release as follows:

Changes in drat version 0.2.4 (2023-10-09)

  • macOS Arm M1 repos are now also supported in pruning and archival (Joey Reid in #135 fixing #134)

  • A minor vignette typo was fixed (Dirk)

  • A small error with setwd() in insertPackage() was corrected (Dirk)

  • macOS x86_64 repos (on big-sur) are now supported too (Arne Johannes Holmin in #139 fixing #138)

  • A few small maintenance tweaks were applied to the CI setup, and to the main README.md

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. More detailed information is on the drat page as well as at the documentation site.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/drat | permanent link

Tue, 19 Sep 2023

RcppInt64 0.0.3 on CRAN: Now with nanotime Support

The still new package RcppInt64 (announced two weeks ago in this post, with this followup last week) arrived on CRAN earlier today in its second update and relase 0.0.3. RcppInt64 collects some of the previous conversions between 64-bit integer values in R and C++, and regroups them in a single package by providing a single header. It offers two interfaces: both a more standard as<>() converter from R values along with its companions wrap() to return to R, as well as more dedicated functions ‘from’ and ‘to’.

This release adds support for the corresponding nanotime conversion between R and C++. nanotime is leveraging the same bit64-based reprensentation of 64-bit integers for nanosecond resolution timestamps. A thorough S4 wrapping the offers R based access for convenient and powerful operations at nanosecond resolution. And as tweeted (here and here), tooted (here and here), and skeeted (here and here) in a quick preview last Sunday, it makes for easy and expressive code.

The brief NEWS entry follows:

Changes in version 0.0.3 (2023-09-19)

  • The as<>() and wrap() converters are now declared inline.

  • Conversion to and from nanotime has been added.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 12 Sep 2023

RcppInt64 0.0.2 on CRAN: Small Update

The still very new package RcppInt64 (announced a week ago in this post) arrived on CRAN earlier today in its first update, now at 0.0.2. RcppInt64 collects some of the previous conversions between 64-bit integer values in R and C++, and regroups them in a single package by providing a single header. It offers two interfaces: both a more standard as<>() converter from R values along with its companions wrap() to return to R, as well as more dedicated functions ‘from’ and ‘to’.

The package by now has its first user as we rearranged RcppFarmHash to use it. The change today makes bit64 a weak rather than strong dependency as we use it only for tests and illustrations. We also added two missing fields to DESCRIPTION and added badges to README.md.

The brief NEWS entry follows:

Changes in version 0.0.2 (2023-09-12)

  • DESCRIPTION has been extended, badges have been added to README.md

  • Package bit64 is now a Suggests:

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a [diffstat report relative to previous release][this release].

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sun, 10 Sep 2023

RcppArmadillo 0.12.6.4.0 on CRAN: Another Upstream Bugfix

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 1096 other packages on CRAN, downloaded 30.5 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 552 times according to Google Scholar.

This release brings bugfix upstream release 12.6.4. Conrad prepared this a few days ago; it takes me the usual day or so to run reverse-dependency check against the by-now almost 1100 CRAN packages using RcppArmadillo. And this time, CRAN thought it had found two issues when I submitted and it took two more days til we were all clear about those two being false positives (as can, and does, happen). So today it reached CRAN.

The set of changes follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.12.6.4.0 (2023-09-06)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 12.6.4 (Cortisol Retox)

    • Workarounds for bugs in Apple accelerate framework

    • Fix incorrect calculation of rcond for band matrices in solve()

    • Remove expensive and seldom used optimisations, leading to faster compilation times

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the Rcpp R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sat, 09 Sep 2023

Carmageddon by Daniel Knowles: A Brief Review

Carmageddon

Daniel Knowles’ Carmageddon: How Cars Make Life Worse and What to Do About It is an entertaining, lucid, and well-written “manifesto” (to borrow a term from the author) aiming to get us all thinking a bit more about what cars do to society, and how to move on to a better outcome for all.

The book alternates between historical context and background, lived experience (as the author is a foreign correspondent who had the opportunity to travel), and researched content. It is refreshingly free of formalities (no endless footnotes or endnotes with references, though I would have liked occassional references but hey we all went to school long enough to do a bit of research given a pointer or two). I learned or relearned a few things as I was for example somewhat unaware of the air pollution (micro-particle) impact stemming from tires and brake abrasions—for which electronic vehicles do zilch, and for which the auto-obesity of ever larger and heavier cars is making things much worse. And some terms (even when re-used by Knowles) are clever such bionic duckweed. But now you need to read the book to catch up on it.

Overall, the book argues its case rather well. The author brings sufficient evidence to make the formal ‘guilty’ charge quite convincing. It is also recent having come out just months ago, making current figures even more relevant.

I forget the exact circumstance but I think I came across the author in the context of our joint obsession with both Chicago and cycling (as there may have been a link from a related social media post) and/or the fact that I followed some of his colleagues at The Economist on social media. Either way, the number of Chicago and MidWest references made for some additional fun when reading the book over a the last few days. And for me another highlight was the ode to Tokyo which I wholeheartedly agree with: on my second trip to Japan I spent a spare day cycling across the city as the AirBnB host kindly gave me access to his bicycles. Great weather, polite drivers, moderate traffic, and just wicked good infrastructure made me wonder why I did not see more cyclists.

I have little to criticize beyond the lack of any references. The repeated insistence on reminding us that Knowles comes from Birmingham gets a little old by the fifth or sixth repetition. It is all a wee bit anglo- or UK-centric. It obviously has a bit on France, Paris, and all the recent success of Anne Hidalgo (who, when I was in graduate school in France, was still a TV person rather than the very successful mayor she is now) but then does not mention the immense (and well known) success of the French train system which lead to a recent dictum to no longer allow intra-Frace air travel if train rides of under 2 1/2 hours are available which is rather remarkable. (Though in fairness that may have been enacted once the book was finished.)

Lastly, the book appears to have a few sections available via Google Books. My copy will good back from one near-west suburban library to the neighbouring one.

Overall a strong recommendation for a very good and timely book.

/books | permanent link

RcppFarmHash 0.0.3 on CRAN: Small Update

A minor maintenance release of the RcppFarmHash package is now on CRAN as version 0.0.3.

RcppFarmHash wraps the Google FarmHash family of hash functions (written by Geoff Pike and contributors) that are used for example by Google BigQuery for the FARM_FINGERPRINT digest.

This releases farms out the conversion to the integer64 add-on type in R to the new package RcppInt64 released a few days ago and adds some minor maintenance on continuous integration and alike.

The brief NEWS entry follows:

Changes in version 0.0.3 (2023-09-09)

  • Rely on new RcppInt64 package and its header for conversion

  • Minor updates to continuous integration and README.md

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Thu, 07 Sep 2023

x13binary 1.1.57-4 on CRAN: Minor Update

Release 1.1.57-4 of the x13binary package providing the X-13ARIMA-SEATS program by the US Census Bureau arrived earlier on CRAN.

This release sets an explicit download timeout option value at the request of CRAN who, just like everybody else, were bitten a little by the instability at GitHub this week.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release showing changes to the previous release.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/x13binary | permanent link

Tue, 05 Sep 2023

RcppInt64 0.0.1 on CRAN: New Package!

Happy to share that a new package RcppInt64 arrived on CRAN earlier today after a brief one-day inspection round. RcppInt64 collects some of the previous conversions between 64-bit integer values in R and C++, and regroups them in a single package.

A single header is provided. It actually offers two interfaces: both a more standard as<>() converter from R values along with its companions wrap() to return to R, as well as more dedicated functions ‘from’ and ‘to’. A key difficulty faced when supporting 64 bit integer payloads is that R has no proper type for it so the standard template-based approaches use by Rcpp do not apply. To ‘carry’ 64 bit integers, the clever approach by Jens Oehlschlägel and his bit64 package is used. However, its use of a double to transport the int64 payload means we must take care to not uninentionally interpret the double variables as, well, double. So we use an simple S3 class in R, and check for it. With some care (as provided by these helper functions) this works well.

The RcppInt64 packages contains both an example function, as well as an entire example package to demonstrate how to use these facilities in your package. We hope others will find this useful.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 29 Aug 2023

RcppArmadillo 0.12.6.3.0 on CRAN: New Upstream Bugfix

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 1092 other packages on CRAN, downloaded 30.3 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 549 times according to Google Scholar.

This release brings bugfix upstream release 12.6.3. We skipped 12.6.2 at CRAN (as discussed in the previous release notes) as it only affected Armadillo-internal random-number generation (RNG). As we default to supplying the RNGs from R, this did not affect RcppArmadillo. The bug fixes in 12.6.3 are for csv reading which too will most likely be done by R tools for R users, but given two minor bugfix releases an update was in order. I ran the full reverse-depenency check against the now more than 1000 packages overnight: no issues. armadillo processing CRAN processed the package fully automatically as it has no issues, and nothing popped up in reverse-dependency checking.

The set of changes for the last two RcppArmadillo releases follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.12.6.3.0 (2023-08-28)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 12.6.3 (Cortisol Retox)

    • Fix for corner-case in loading CSV files with headers

    • For consistent file handling, all .load() functions now open text files in binary mode

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.12.6.2.0 (2023-08-08)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 12.6.2 (Cortisol Retox)

    • use thread-safe Mersenne Twister as the default RNG on all platforms

    • use unique RNG seed for each thread within multi-threaded execution (such as OpenMP)

    • explicitly document arma_rng::set_seed() and arma_rng::set_seed_random()

  • None of the changes above affect R use as RcppArmadillo connects the RNGs used by R to Armadillo

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the Rcpp R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sun, 20 Aug 2023

RcppRedis 0.2.4 on CRAN: Maintenance

Another minor release, now at 0.2.4, of our RcppRedis package arrived on CRAN yesterday. RcppRedis is one of several packages connecting R to the fabulous Redis in-memory datastructure store (and much more). RcppRedis does not pretend to be feature complete, but it may do some things faster than the other interfaces, and also offers an optional coupling with MessagePack binary (de)serialization via RcppMsgPack. The package has carried production loads on a trading floor for several years. It also supports pub/sub dissemination of streaming market data as per this earlier example.

This update is (just like the previous one) fairly mechanical. CRAN noticed a shortcoming of the default per-package help page in a number of packages, in our case it was matter of adding one line for a missing alias to the Rd file. We also demoted the mention of the suggested (but retired) rredis package to a mere mention in the DESCRIPTION file as a formal Suggests: entry, even with an added Additional_repositories, create a NOTE. Life is simpler without those,

The detailed changes list follows.

Changes in version 0.2.4 (2023-08-19)

  • Add missing alias for ‘RcppRedis-package’ to rhiredis.Rd.

  • Remove Suggests: rredis which triggers a NOTE nag as it is only on an ‘Additional_repositories’.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this this release. More information is on the RcppRedis page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Thu, 17 Aug 2023

#43: r2u Faster Than the Alternatives

Welcome to the 43th post in the $R^4 series.

And with that, a good laugh. When I set up Sunday’s post, I was excited enough about the (indeed exciting !!) topic of r2u via browser or vscode that I mistakenly labeled it as the 41th post. And overlooked the existing 41th post from July! So it really is as if Douglas Adams, Arthur Dent, and, for good measure, Dirk Gently, looked over my shoulder and declared there shall not be a 42th post!! So now we have two 41th post: Sunday’s and July’s.

Back the current topic, which is of course r2u. Earlier this week we had a failure in (an R based) CI run (using a default action which I had not set up). A package was newer in source than binary, so a build from source was attempted. And of course failed as it was a package needing a system dependency to build. Which the default action did not install.

I am familiar with the problem via my general use of r2u (or my r-ci which uses it under the hood). And there we use a bspm variable to prefer binary over possibly newer source. So I was curious how one would address this with the default actions. It so happens that the same morning I spotted a StackOverflow question on the same topic, where the original poster had suffered the exact same issue!

I offered my approach (via r2u) as a comment and was later notified of a follow-up answer by the OP. Turns our there is a new, more powerful action that does all this, potentially flipping to a newer version and building it, all while using a cache.

Now I was curious, and in the evening cloned the repo to study the new approach and compare the new action to what r2u offers. In particular, I was curious if a use of caches would be benficial on repeated runs. A screenshot of the resulting Actions and their times follows.

Turns out maybe not so much (yet ?). As the actions page of my cloned ‘comparison repo’ shows in this screenshot, r2u is consistently faster at always below one minute compared to new entrant at always over two minutes. (I should clarify that the original actions sets up dependencies, then scrapes, and commits. I am timing only the setup of dependencies here.)

We can also extract the six datapoints and quickly visualize them.

Now, this is of course entirely possibly that not all possible venues for speedups were exploited in how the action setup was setup. If so, please file an issue at the repo and I will try to update accordingly. But for now it seems that a default of setup r2u is easily more than twice as fast as an otherwise very compelling alternative (with arguably much broader scope). However, where r2u choses to play, on the increasingly common, popular and powerful Ubuntu LTS setup, it clearly continues to run circles around alternate approaches. So the saying remains:

r2u: fast, easy, reliable.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Originally posted 2023-08-13, minimally edited 2023-08-15 which changed the timestamo and URL.

/code/r4 | permanent link

Tue, 15 Aug 2023

#41: Using r2u in Codespaces

Welcome to the 41th post in the $R^4 series. This post draws on joint experiments first started by Grant building on the lovely work done by Eitsupi as part of our Rocker Project. In short, r2u is an ideal match for Codespaces, a Microsoft/GitHub service to run code ‘locally but in the cloud’ via browser or Visual Studio Code. This posts co-serves as the README.md in the .devcontainer directory as well as a vignette for r2u.

So let us get into it. Starting from the r2u repository, the .devcontainer directory provides a small self-containted file devcontainer.json to launch an executable environment R using r2u. It is based on the example in Grant McDermott’s codespaces-r2u repo and reuses its documentation. It is driven by the Rocker Project’s Devcontainer Features repo creating a fully functioning R environment for cloud use in a few minutes. And thanks to r2u you can add easily to this environment by installing new R packages in a fast and failsafe way.

Try it out

To get started, simply click on the green “Code” button at the top right. Then select the “Codespaces” tab and click the “+” symbol to start a new Codespace.

The first time you do this, it will open up a new browser tab where your Codespace is being instantiated. This first-time instantiation will take a few minutes (feel free to click “View logs” to see how things are progressing) so please be patient. Once built, your Codespace will deploy almost immediately when you use it again in the future.

After the VS Code editor opens up in your browser, feel free to open up the examples/sfExample.R file. It demonstrates how r2u enables us install packages and their system-dependencies with ease, here installing packages sf (including all its geospatial dependencies) and ggplot2 (including all its dependencies). You can run the code easily in the browser environment: Highlight or hover over line(s) and execute them by hitting Cmd+Return (Mac) / Ctrl+Return (Linux / Windows).

(Both example screenshots reflect the initial codespaces-r2u repo as well as personal scratchspace one which we started with, both of course work here too.)

Do not forget to close your Codespace once you have finished using it. Click the “Codespaces” tab at the very bottom left of your code editor / browser and select “Close Current Codespace” in the resulting pop-up box. You can restart it at any time, for example by going to https://github.com/codespaces and clicking on your instance.

Extend r2u with r-universe

r2u offers “fast, easy, reliable” access to all of CRAN via binaries for Ubuntu focal and jammy. When using the latter (as is the default), it can be combined with r-universe and its Ubuntu jammy binaries. We demontrates this in a second example file examples/censusExample.R which install both the cellxgene-census and tiledbsoma R packages as binaries from r-universe (along with about 100 dependencies), downloads single-cell data from Census and uses Seurat to create PCA and UMAP decomposition plots. Note that in order run this you have to change the Codespaces default instance from ‘small’ (4gb ram) to ‘large’ (16gb ram).

Local DevContainer build

Codespaces are DevContainers running in the cloud (where DevContainers are themselves just Docker images running with some VS Code sugar on top). This gives you the very powerful ability to ‘edit locally’ but ‘run remotely’ in the hosted codespace. To test this setup locally, simply clone the repo and open it up in VS Code. You will need to have Docker installed and running on your system (see here). You will also need the Remote Development extension (you will probably be prompted to install it automatically if you do not have it yet). Select “Reopen in Container” when prompted. Otherwise, click the >< tab at the very bottom left of your VS Code editor and select this option. To shut down the container, simply click the same button and choose “Reopen Folder Locally”. You can always search for these commands via the command palette too (Cmd+Shift+p / Ctrl+Shift+p).

Use in Your Repo

To add this ability of launching Codespaces in the browser (or editor) to a repo of yours, create a directory .devcontainers in your selected repo, and add the file .devcontainers/devcontainer.json. You can customize it by enabling other feature, or use the postCreateCommand field to install packages (while taking full advantage of r2u).

Acknowledgments

There are a few key “plumbing” pieces that make everything work here. Thanks to:

Colophon

More information about r2u is at its site, and we answered some question in issues, and at stackoverflow. More questions are always welcome!

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Originally posted 2023-08-13, minimally edited 2023-08-15 which changed the timestamo and URL.

/code/r4 | permanent link

Thu, 10 Aug 2023

RcppArmadillo 0.12.6.1.0 on CRAN: New Upstream

armadillo image

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 1092 other packages on CRAN, downloaded 30.1 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 545 times according to Google Scholar.

This release brings bugfix upstream release 12.6.1. Conrad release 12.6.0 when CRAN went on summer break. I rolled it up ran the full reverse-depenency check against the now more than 1000 packages. And usage from one those revealed a corner-case bug (of not always ‘flattening’ memory for sparse matrices to zero values) so 12.6.1 followed. This is what was uploaded today. And as I prepared it earlier in the week as CRAN reopened, Conrad released a new 12.6.2. However, its changes are only concerned with settings for Armadillo-internal use of its random number generators (RNGs). And as RcppArmadillo connects Armadillo to the RNGs provided by R, the upgrade does not affect R users at all. However it is available in the github repo, in the Rcpp drap repo and at r-universe.

The set of changes for this RcppArmadillo release follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.12.6.1.0 (2023-07-26)

  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 12.6.1 (Cortisol Retox)

    • faster multiplication of dense vectors by sparse matrices (and vice versa)

    • faster eigs_sym() and eigs_gen()

    • faster conv() and conv2() when using OpenMP

    • added diags() and spdiags() for generating band matrices from set of vectors

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a [diffstat report relative to previous release]. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the Rcpp R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Tue, 08 Aug 2023

dtts 0.1.1 on CRAN: Enhancements

Leonardo and I are happy to announce the release of a first follow-up release 0.1.1 of our dtts package which got to [CRAN][cran] in its initial upload last year.

dtts builds upon our nanotime package as well as the beloved data.table to bring high-performance and high-resolution indexing at the nanosecond level to data frames. dtts aims to bring the time-series indexing versatility of xts (and zoo) to the immense power of data.table while supporting highest nanosecond resolution.

This release fixes a bug flagged by valgrind and brings several internal enhancements.

Changes in version 0.1.1 (2023-08-08)

  • A simplifcation was applied to the C++ interface glue code (#9 fixing #8)

  • The package no longer enforces the C++11 compilation standard (#10)

  • An uninitialized memory read has been correct (#11)

  • A new function ops has been added (#12)

  • Function names no longer start with a dot (#13)

  • Arbitrary index columns are now supported (#13)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the this release this release. Questions, comments, issue tickets can be brought to the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/dtts | permanent link

Mon, 07 Aug 2023

RQuantLib 0.4.19 on CRAN: More Maintenance

A new release 0.4.19 of RQuantLib arrived at CRAN earlier today, and has already been uploaded to Debian too.

QuantLib is a rather comprehensice free/open-source library for quantitative finance. RQuantLib connects it to the R environment and language, and has been part of CRAN for more than twenty years (!!)

This release of RQuantLib brings a small update to three unit tests as very recent 1.31 release QuantLib brought a subtle change to some fixed income payment schedules and dates. On a sadder note, as CRAN now checks the ratio of ‘user time’ over ‘elapsed time’, excessive threading was inferred for five examples. As we seemingly cannot limit std::thread here, I opted to park these examples behind a \dontrun{}. Not ideal. Lastly, a few version checks in configure were updated.

Changes in RQuantLib version 0.4.19 (2023-08-07)

  • Three calendaring / schedule tests were adjusted for slightly changed values under QuantLib 1.31

  • Several checks in the configure script have been updated to reflect current versions of packages.

  • Five examples no longer run because, even while extremely short, use of (too many default) threads was seen.

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the this release 0.4.19. As always, more detailed information is on the RQuantLib page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rquantlib-devel mailing list. Issue tickets can be filed at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rquantlib | permanent link

Sun, 23 Jul 2023

#41: Another r2u Example – Really Simple CI

Welcome to the 41th post in the $R^4 series. Just as the previous post illustrated r2u use to empower interactive Google Colab sessions, today we want to look at continuous integration via GitHub Actions.

Actions are very powerful, yet also intimidating and complex. How does one know what to run? How does ensure requirements are installed? What does these other actions do?

Here we offer a much simpler yet fully automatic solution. It takes advantage of the fact that r2u integrates fully and automatically with the system, here apt, without us having to worry about the setup. One way to make this very easy is the use of the Rocker containers for r2u. They already include the few lines of simple (and scriptable) setup, and have bspm setup so that R commands to install packages dispatch to apt and will bring all required dependencies automatically and easily.

With that the required yaml file for an action can be as simple as this:

name: r2u

on:
  push:
  pull_request:
  release:

jobs:
  ci:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    container:
      image: rocker/r2u:latest
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: SessionInfo
        run: R -q -e 'sessionInfo()'
      #- name: System Dependencies
      #  # can be used to install e.g. cmake or other build dependencies
      #  run: apt update -qq && apt install --yes --no-install-recommends cmake git
      - name: Package Dependencies
        run: R -q -e 'remotes::install_deps(".", dependencies=TRUE)'
      - name: Build Package
        run: R CMD build --no-build-vignettes --no-manual .
      - name: Check Package
        run: R CMD check --no-vignettes --no-manual $(ls -1tr *.tar.gz | tail -1)

There are only a few key components here.

First, we have the on block where for simplicity we select pushes, pull requests and releases. One could reduce this to just pushes by removing or commenting out the next two lines. Many further refinements are possible and documented but not reqired.

Second, the jobs section and its sole field ci saythat we are running this CI on Ubuntu in its latest release. Importantly we then also select the rocker container for r2 meaning that we explicitly select running in this container (which happens to be an extension and refinement of ubuntu-latest). The latest tag points to the most recent LTS release, currently jammy aka 22.04. This choice also means that our runs are limited to Ubuntu and exclude macOS and Windows. That is a choice: not every CI task needs to burn extra (and more expensive) cpu cycles on the alternative OS, yet those can always be added via other yaml files possibly conditioned on fewer runs (say: only pull requests) if needed.

Third, we have the basic sequence of steps. We check out the repo this file is part of (very standard). After that we ask R show the session info in case we need to troubleshoot. (These two lines could be commented out.) Next we show a commented-out segment we needed in another repo where we needed to add cmake and git as the package in question required local compilation during build. Such a need is fairly rare, but as shown can be be accomodated easily while taking advantage of the rich development infrastructure provided by Ubuntu. But the step should be optional for most R packages so it is commented out here. The next step uses the remotes package to look at the DESCRIPTION file and install all dependencies which, thanks to r2u and bspm, will use all Ubuntu binaries making it both very fast, very easy, and generally failsafe. Finally we do the two standard steps of building the source package and checking it (while omitting vignettes and the (pdf) manual as the container does not bother with a full texlive installation—this could be altered if desired in a derived container).

And that’s it! The startup cost is a few seconds to pull the container, plus a few more seconds for dependencies – and let us recall that e.g. the entire tidyverse installs all one hundred plus packages in about twenty seconds as shown in earlier post. After that the next cost is generally just what it takes to build and check your package once all requirements are in.

To use such a file for continuous integration, we can install it in the .github/workflows/ directory of a repository. One filename I have used is .github/workflows/r2u.yaml making it clear what this does and how.

More information about r2u is at its site, and we answered some question in issues, and at stackoverflow. More questions are always welcome!

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/r4 | permanent link

Wed, 19 Jul 2023

qlcal 0.0.7 on CRAN: QuantLib 1.31 Updates

The seventh release of the still pretty new qlcal package arrivied at CRAN today.

qlcal delivers the calendaring parts of QuantLib. It is provided (for the R package) as a set of included files, so the package is self-contained and does not depend on an external QuantLib library (which can be demanding to build). qlcal covers over sixty country / market calendars and can compute holiday lists, its complement (i.e. business day lists) and much more.

This release brings updates from the just-released QuantLib 1.31 version.

Changes in version 0.0.7 (2023-07-19)

  • Updates, extensions and corrections to calendars from South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore, India, Taiwan, South Africa, Denmark and Finland from QuantLib 1.31

  • Added support for UnitedStates/SOFR calendar

As the update comprises a number of small-but-important updates to eight different country calendars as well as a new US calendar (in a slight variation on the government bond calendar) we can also update the little demo highlighting all calendars within the US for the given year:

> ## see https://github.com/qlcal/qlcal-r/blob/master/demo/allUScalendars.R
> ## see R/calendars.R in qlcal, we prepend 'UnitedStates/' in makeHol()
> cals <- c("LiborImpact", "NYSE", "GovernmentBond", "NERC", "FederalReserve", "SOFR")
> print(Reduce(cbind, Map(makeHol, cals)))
           LiborImpact NYSE GovernmentBond NERC FederalReserve SOFR
2023-01-02        TRUE TRUE           TRUE TRUE           TRUE TRUE
2023-01-16        TRUE TRUE           TRUE   NA           TRUE TRUE
2023-02-20        TRUE TRUE           TRUE   NA           TRUE TRUE
2023-04-07          NA TRUE             NA   NA             NA TRUE
2023-05-29        TRUE TRUE           TRUE TRUE           TRUE TRUE
2023-06-19        TRUE TRUE           TRUE   NA           TRUE TRUE
2023-07-04        TRUE TRUE           TRUE TRUE           TRUE TRUE
2023-09-04        TRUE TRUE           TRUE TRUE           TRUE TRUE
2023-10-09        TRUE   NA           TRUE   NA           TRUE TRUE
2023-11-10        TRUE   NA             NA   NA             NA   NA
2023-11-23        TRUE TRUE           TRUE TRUE           TRUE TRUE
2023-12-25        TRUE TRUE           TRUE TRUE           TRUE TRUE
> 

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report for this release. See the project page and package documentation for more details, and more examples.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/qlcal | permanent link

Mon, 10 Jul 2023

RcppSpdlog 0.0.14 on CRAN: Upstream Update

Version 0.0.14 of RcppSpdlog is now on CRAN and has just been uploaded to Debian. RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovich. You can learn more at the nice package documention site.

This release simply brings an update to the just release spdlog 1.12.0 from a few days ago.

The NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in RcppSpdlog version 0.0.14 (2023-07-09)

  • Added new badge to README.md

  • Upgraded to upstream releases spdlog 1.12.0

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report. More detailed information is on the RcppSpdlog page, or the package documention site.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/rcpp | permanent link

Sat, 08 Jul 2023

#40: Another r2u Example – Making Colab Easier

Welcome to the 40th post in the $R^4 series. This one will just be a very brief illustration of r2u use in what might be an unexpected place: Google Colab. Colab has a strong bent towards Jupyter and Python but has been supporting R compute kernels for some time (by changing what they call the ‘runtime’). And with a little exploration one can identify these are (currently, as of July 2023) running Ubuntu 20.04 aka ‘focal’.

Which is of course one of two system supported by our lovely r2u project (with the other being the newer 22.04 aka ‘jammy’). And I mostly tweeted / tooted about r2u since the its introduction in #37. And gave basically just a mention in passing in ‘faster feedback’ post #38 as well as the ‘faster feedback in ci’ post #39). So a brief recap may be in order. In essence, r2u makes all of CRAN available as full-fledged Ubuntu binaries with complete and full dependencies which are then installed directly and quickly via apt. Which, to top it of, are accessed directly from R via install.packages() so no special knowledge or sauce needed. We often summarize it as “fast, easy, reliable: what is not to like”.

And, as we established in a few minutes of probing, it also works in the ‘focal’-based Colab session. The screen shot shows the basic step of fetching the setup script (for ‘plain’ Ubuntu focal system) from r2u, making it executable and running it. Total time: 34 seconds. And after that we see the pure magic of install.packages("tidyverse") installing all of it in nine seconds. Additionally, we add the brms package in thirty-one seconds cia install.packages("brms"). Both load just fine and echo their current values.

r2u on colab focal

The commands that are executed in that R session are just

download.file("https://github.com/eddelbuettel/r2u/raw/master/inst/scripts/add_cranapt_focal.sh",
              "add_cranapt_focal.sh")
Sys.chmod("add_cranapt_focal.sh", "0755")
system("./add_cranapt_focal.sh")
install.packages("tidyverse")
library(tidyverse)
install.packages("brms")
library(brms)

The timings are the Colab notebook are visible in the left margin. The lack of output makes debugging a little trickier so I still recommend to use r2u for first expploration via a Docker container as e.g. rocker/r2u:jammy.

More information about r2u is at its site, and we answered some question in issues, and at stackoverflow. More questions are always welcome!

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/r4 | permanent link

Fri, 07 Jul 2023

digest 0.6.33 on CRAN: Bugfix

Release 0.6.33 of the digest package arrived at CRAN today and has been uploaded to Debian already.

digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, spookyhash, blake3, and crc32c algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects. It is a mature and widely-used (with 58.6 million downloads just on the partial cloud mirrors of CRAN which keep logs) as many tasks may involve caching of objects for which it provides convenient general-purpose hash key generation to quickly identify the various objects.

This release corrects a bad bug we accidentally introduced in release 0.6.32 a little under two weeks ago. As described we added crc32c and aimed for the simple ‘portable’ approach (given that the accelerated version is now availble in our package crc32c) but overlooked one setting which promptly broked compilation on M1/M2/Arm64 (which we do not have access too, sadly). This was actually reported in issue #189 on the very day 0.6.32 was released and even before we got to blog about its announcement so that we could even mention it in the third paragraph there.

This fix was a one-liner, and was committed hours later. Now, as it sometimes happens, processing the new upload at CRAN took some time. They appeared to be down the next day not processing anything. Once opened again, they reported ‘changes to worse’ as can be seen in reverse-dependency checks. Turns out those were false positive (“it happens”) but then the package lingered a little longer and quite a lot of folks chimed in at in issue #189. I have now learned that there were in fact some temporary hardware issues in one of the CRAN locations, so it all had a reason—but most importantly it is all better now. My apologies for the temporary breakage, we attempted to address it swiftly but sometimes things beyond our control (and reach) do slow things down. Now new and fixed binaries should appear in the next few days.

My CRANberries provides the usual summary of changes to the previous version. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

/code/digest | permanent link